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One dollar’s worth of Melatonin reduces clotting, sepsis and death for Covid. Maybe we should study it?

Here’s another unpatentable, natural, safe molecule that appears to work against Covid and will probably never be mentioned by any Chief Health Officer who wants a cushy job with the WHO or Pfizer.

Melatonin molecule

The Melatonin Molecule by Jynto

An Iraqi group enrolled 158 Covid patients, and gave half of them 10mg of Melatonin a day. All patients got “standard care”, meaning they all got remdesivir, dexamethasone, and an anticoagulant, but some 82 lucky patients were randomly picked to get melatonin as well. The average age of participants was 56 and most of them were men (70%).

By Day 17 a quarter of the control group were suffering from blood clotting (or thrombosis), but only 11% of the melatonin group were, or half as many.

By Day 11, eight patients in the control group had developed sepsis. Only two patients taking melatonin did. Sepsis is a systemic condition where basic things like blood pressure, heart rate, and temperature are running awry, and things are getting out of control. By Day 17, a third of the control group had sepsis, but only 8% of controls the test group with melatonin did. It’s the kind of condition that kills people.

Indeed mortality in the melatonin group was 1%, but in the control group it was 17%. These study numbers are small, but no one needs to do a Chi Squared test to see if that’s significant.  (p=0.001) All up, thirteen people died in the group that didn’t get melatonin, but only one person died in the group that did.

The authors (Hasnan et al) stay very calm and merely conclude, Adjuvant use of Melatonin may help reduce thrombosis, sepsis, and mortality in COVID-19 patients. 

I feel a bit sorry for the unlucky sods in the control group. But in reality, I feel sorry for all of us. Many of the aspects of melatonin that make it appealing as a potential helper against Covid have been known for a long time. Melatonin is not just a sleepy-hormone, it’s also anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-viral and immunomodulatory. Yet here we are, discussing tiny Iraqi studies 23 months into a global pandemic because there aren’t large controlled studies of tens of thousands of people in the West.

These patients took melatonin for two weeks. The total cost is around $1.20 for the full course.

These numbers could be affected by other factors the researchers didn’t know about. But they tried to control for things like asthma, heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.

For a long time the FLCCC Math protocol has included melatonin 6 – 12mg at night “until discharge”.

Melatonin is an ancient hormone that our pineal glands produce each night. Children make a lot of it. As we get older, we make less. It’s quite likely that this is one of the reasons children cope better with Covid infections than older people do.

I’ll have more to say about this soon. There are other papers…

h/t Scott for prodding, Old Ozzie, Peter C, FatAl, Hanrahan, and Bill in Oz, Sunni bakchat, Conan Kirtan, Dave in the States for mentions a long time ago.

 

REFERENCE

Hasnan et al (2021)  The Effect of Melatonin on Thrombosis, Sepsis and Mortality Rate in COVID-19 Patients,  International Journal of Infectious Diseases, October, Preprint. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2021.10.012

9.8 out of 10 based on 80 ratings

92 comments to One dollar’s worth of Melatonin reduces clotting, sepsis and death for Covid. Maybe we should study it?

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Happy with above – only problem for me, Melatonin 10mg does not help me sleep, but I will continue – PS no drug that says Caution this drug may make you drowsy has ever made me drowsy.

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    • #
      Bruce

      Have you tried rum and warm milk?

      80

    • #
      Hanrahan

      The only drug I take a lot of is antihistamine so I used to take polaramine, an older one with the warning Caution this drug may make you drowsy but it never did, but it too is on the list of helpful drugs for WuFlu.

      There must be twenty drugs, minerals and micronutrients which have demonstrated effectiveness on their own. How good would they be in a c0cktail?

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      • #
        R.B.

        It turned me into a zombie (I got better). Even the generic cetrizine makes me drowsy, but not Zyrtec. And with the recent weather, I’m going to need it.

        10

    • #
      Catherine

      It might be a good idea to learn from Europes Winter.

      The Netherlands:
      ‘This week the infection graph should have gone down, but it is not yet detected. With more than 23,000 new infections on Tuesday, an average of almost 40 ICU admissions per day and almost 250 new patients in the nursing wards, all signals are red.’

      Belgium:
      ‘With the current figures, we are on our way to 1,000 beds with corona patients in the intensive care units or even more. That says virologist Steven van Gucht. “Hopefully we will soon see the impact of the latest measures. Everyone can do their bit to contain the fourth wave.” :

      This should include the opportunity for doctors to discuss an early treatment plan with their patients instead of having to give the advise: “stay home and isolate”

      Christmas events are cancelled.

      Germany…
      Austria…

      20

  • #
    TdeF

    Let’s see them try to ban Melatonin as they have done with Invermectin. The amount of fast money in Wu Flu is driving the pharmacy industry.

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    • #
      Geoff+Croker

      There are MANY helpful, long known, treatments for Covid derived viruses. We live in a follow the money environment. As we make less locally it leads to follow the foreign money. Really its follow the print run. Who is the BIGGEST printer? The reserve currency, the FED. The FED print run is fully ON. Assets are inflating across most currencies. A cheap drug is not going to inflate. It cannot attract printed money.

      Our complete lack of “making stuff” can only lead to our government regulators approving “foreign stuff.” The TGA have no resolve or capacity to investigate a drug.

      Any Australian company can bottle Ivermectin and claim it treats covid. The problem is the cost of a proper investigation. Without a means of paying for trials nothing will happen.

      The number of fully vaccinated covid sick is rising. We will be told to get a booster…… or else we are bad people. There will be enough locally sick people to do trials. Its the money that is missing.

      As it becomes obvious that the current leaky vaccines are not helpful our government will double down and force us to take more of them. They MUST divide us by marketing fear to stay electable. First rule of politics.

      380

    • #
      Mal

      I have been using 10 mg of melatonin for a couple of years now to assist with sleep
      It is effective to a degree, ie I fall asleep quickly but wake at 3.30 am before drifting off again
      I was put into it by my doctor
      I get it online from I herb (nature’s bounty) and costs $16 for 60 tablets delivered to your door
      There are cheaper brands but no guarantee whether they have full quality
      Good to know there are positive side benefits

      100

      • #
        greggg

        Taking sustained release melatonin will help sleep through the night. I take a lozenge for quick effect and a SR tablet so I don’t wake early.

        50

        • #

          gregg is right about the slow release.

          10mg is a big dose, especially in one hit, especially for regular use.
          There is talk of a rebound effect after a big dose that may wake people up 5 hours or so later.

          There is even a move to shift to small 300mcg doses to achieve the sleep inducing effect without the rebound.

          If people are thinking of trying it for sleep on a regular basis I would suggest starting with small doses and building up and using slow release.

          5HTP is a precursor molecule — your body uses to produce melatonin. Some people find that works better. It’s converted to serotonin at daylight times of the clock, so some people find it doesn’t make for a groggy feel. It may just make them calm as a side effect.

          Obviously, be wary anyone on SSRI’s of mixing their supps and drugs. Get medical advice etc.

          70

  • #
    Vicki

    Thanks Jo! I have been debating whether I should include Melatonin in my stockpile of supplements. May not use it as a prophylactic, but will be there as part of the ammunition.

    Any thoughts out there re possible adverse effects of various supplements when taken together on a daily basis?

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  • #
    Simon

    I used to take melatonin sometimes on long-haul flights, it was purchasable over the counter at Changi airport. It used to knock me out like a light, which was not good if a flight was diverted and I had to disembark while still under the influence. It’s a powerful drug with major side-effects. It may be useful but I hesitate to call it safe.

    227

  • #
    Simon

    It’s quite likely that this is one of the reasons children cope better with Covid infections than older people do.

    Pure conjecture and very unlikely. The most probable cause that children have more resistance is that they have more frequent exposure to coronaviruses.

    022

    • #
      TedM

      Actually Simon children have a more powerful innate immune system which they need because they haven’t had the chance to develop adaptive imunity.

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    • #
      TedM

      I wanted to give you a green tick for quoting Jo’s sentence with regard to children Simon. But after your contrary final sentence..Nah! red tick from me.

      20

    • #
      Hanrahan

      You accuse Jo of conjecture and then do the same yourself ie no citation.

      110

    • #
      Kalm Keith

      This is uncanny, you say;

      ” the reasons children cope better with Covid infections than older people do __ is that they have more frequent exposure to coronaviruses”.

      Again we are in total agreement.

      There’s no need for these notional “VaXXines” when a properly set up natural immune system will do the job for free and leave the happy traveler with a robust system that will be stronger when it meets the next challenge.

      Well done Simon.

      120

      • #
        Simon

        Would you really rather catch COVID-19 than have a vaccine? That’s a very dangerous game you’re playing. There are a lot of long COVID sufferers out there.

        031

        • #
          Kalm Keith

          As I said; six adverse reactions.

          Not CV19, just the VaXXine and long term damage at age 60 you could probably say, well O.K., I did well.

          But.

          The most recent report is from a 12 year old girl and I suspect that the clotting and heart trouble may just be the more immediate and noticeable problems; Long VaXX may be there hidden. It may be another ten years or so before the girl’s reproductive system is tested.

          Dad could get a little anxious if he understood everything, but I hear he is blissfully unaware of anything naughty coming from Big Pharma.

          150

        • #
          Hanrahan

          Would you really rather catch COVID-19 than have a vaccine?

          Simple answer: Yes, if I was then allowed to go about my business freely.

          Disclaimers:
          I am in the at risk age group.
          I have no other risk factors.
          They are NOT injecting kids in my name.

          160

        • #
          markx

          Long COVID:

          How many people get ‘long COVID’? More than half, researchers find
          Half of COVID survivors experience lingering symptoms six months after recovery
          Date: October 13, 2021 Source: Penn State
          Summary:
          More than half of the 236 million people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 worldwide since December 2019 will experience post-COVID symptoms — more commonly known as ‘long COVID’ — up to six months after recovering, according to researchers.
          https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/10/211013114112.htm

          More:

          1.3. “Long COVID”-real world scenario
          A report from Italy found that 87% of people recovered and discharged from hospitals showed persistence of at least one symptom even at 60 days [16]. Of these 32% had one or two symptoms, where as 55% had three or more. Fever or features of acute illness was not seen in these patients. The commonly reported problems were fatigue (53.1%), worsened quality of life (44.1%), dyspnoea (43.4%), joint pain, (27.3%) and chest pain (21.7%). Cough, skin rashes, palpitations, headache, diarrhea, and ‘pins and needles’ sensation were the other symptoms reported. Patients also reported inability to do routine daily activities, in addition to mental health issues such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder.

          Another study found that COVID-19 patients discharged from hospital experience breathlessness and excessive fatigue even at 3 months [17].
          The prevalence of residual symptoms is about 35% in patients treated for COVID-19 on outpatient basis, but around 87% among cohorts of hospitalized patients [16,18].
          The percentage of people, who failed to return to their job at 14–21 days after becoming COVID positive, was 35% according to one survey [18]
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8056514/

          12

          • #
            Yonason

            @markx

            That could be because of the gross mismanagement of the disease. Sending people home until their lips turn blue, and then giving them sub optimal care in the ICU when they do go to the hospital, seems sure to guarantee an extended convalescence and incomplete recovery.

            I.e., Long COVID seems more likely due to medical malfeasance than to the virus.

            50

        • #
          FatAl

          Yes, I would much prefer to be immunised over catching the full-blown covid disease. Thing is,
          a) we don’t have a proper vaccine that confers immunity, and
          b) there are things you can do to minimise the disease.

          And for anyone who still thinks these “vaccines” are the answer, maybe https://market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=244300 and the papers referenced in that post will shock you to your senses. But I doubt it.

          120

        • #
          Yonason

          “Would you really rather catch COVID-19 than have a vaccine?” – Simon

          False choice, Simon.

          If I refuse the shot, which I know could kill** or maim me, that doesn’t mean I have chosen to get the virus. I may not. But if I do get the virus, I know what to take for an optimal outcome. And, since the vax doesn’t guarantee I won’t get the virus, or that won’t be as bad or worse if I contract it, I’m better off not taking the shot in any case.

          **over 19,000 according to VAERS, and over 30,000 according to the European equivalent of VAERS, with no end in sight. The US number being only somewhere between 1% to 10% of the real number, and possibly the European, as well.

          10

    • #
      David

      So you would argue that the key for achieving resistance lies in a person’s immune response
      as recruited by the body through exposure to these viruses rather than introducing vaccines of
      patently questionable efficacy and closing down society to prevent exposure and hence natural
      immunity?

      80

      • #
        Forrest Gardener

        I for one agree with that sentiment. And that is why I hold out some hope for NovaVax, and for widely available home testing, and for effective antivirals.

        Speaking of home testing I had my first rapid flow test on Sunday in order to be admitted into my mother’s aged care home. I was very relieved that the nurse permitted me to put the stick up the nose myself.

        80

      • #
        Will

        Yes, I do believe that was the original concept behind actual vaccines as opposed to the m-RNA rubbish posing as such. : )

        10

    • #
      Phil O'Sophical

      The virus was designed to bind with the ACE2 receptors, which is a little like border guards welcoming in the enemy – fiendishly clever (evil). But Children have lower levels of expression of ACE2 in their nasal epithelial cells, a primary route for infection, so they are not open to invasion by this route. I think it was Dr Roger Seheult who explained this way back at the beginning, in one of his MedCram videos.

      20

  • #
    TedM

    The FLCCC group of Drs. have been using melatonin in their arsenal of medications to treat covid19 for the best part of a year now. It’s often mentioned in their interviews, but this is the first study that I have seen for myself.

    160

  • #
    Klem

    I don’t think studying Melatonin will help us move closer to social credit, do you?

    110

  • #
    David Maddison

    As independent thinking people are aware, Australia is an extreme Nanny State.

    Some years ago I looked into getting some melatonin to see if it would help with my insomnia. At that time medical doctors (except endocrinologists) were not allowed to prescribe it for that purpose and any attempt to import it would result in extreme penalties if you were caught, as though you were importing a recreational drug or other contraband.

    This was at a time I was aware it was freely available over the counter in the United States, even Costco was selling it.

    Eventually someone in the TGA got clue and realised it was not a dangerous drug after all and doctors were allowed to prescribe it. Then restrictions were eased further. But just so Aussies can be reminded of our NANNY STATE status, it is still restricted and can only be bought in pharmacies and only for those over 55 without presecription. Presumably those under 55 still need a prescription.

    As a sleep aid it has little to no benefit for me but its good it now has this “off label” use, something that the TGA frowns upon as we have seen with anti-virals in relation to COVID. I wonder how long before the TGA bans melatonin for COVID treatment? After all, it is most certainly off patent and the TGA prefers only the offerings of Big Pharma, even more so if they are expensive and useless.

    Melatonin is part of the I-MASK+ prophylaxis and early treatment protocol for COVID by the FLCCC Alliance.

    260

    • #
      KP

      ” I wonder how long before the TGA bans melatonin for COVID treatment? ”

      Two days time after this article! They use Jo’s blog to find out what they need to ban.

      80

      • #
        TedM

        The TGA will probably make it prescription only as the US FDA did with n-acetyl-l-cysteine when it was found to be an effective immune modulator to help control the cytokine storm.

        10

    • #
      Gerry

      Just a side note David. A pet hate of mine is the term “recreational drug”. As someone who has witnessed the ravages of chronic marijuana, amphetamine and cocaine use, this term sticks in the jaw. It’s developed from the term “recreational drug use” with the word “recreational” being an adjective to describe the type of drug use. Now it’s being used to describe types of drugs. The impact caused to many by their marijuana use eg can be permanent and completely debilitating …calling some drugs “recreational” is a major public health blunder imo.

      50

  • #
    RobB

    UK data is showing that deaths from all causes in vaccinated people is twice that of the unvaccinated, for people in the 10 to 59 year old age bracket:

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2021/11/shocking-uk-study-stuns-medical-community-vaccinated-people-60-younger-twice-likely-die-unvaccinated-people/

    Original data is here, in Table 4:
    https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/deathsbyvaccinationstatusengland

    with a caveat, footnote 8

    170

    • #
      Custer Van Cleef

      If you look at weeks 19-25 (Table 2 All-cause mortality), the odds were really bad for people who hadn’t yet had a second dose but were more than 21 days beyond their first dose of mRNA.

      For seven weeks in a row, the ASMR (age-standardized mortality rate) is stuck over 100 deaths per 100k.
      The average population of that group during those weeks is around 6 million … so they can’t complain the sample was too small.

      By contrast, the Unvaccinated group’s ASMR is less than 35, for all seven weeks … and it’s a larger population.

      The confidence limits check out. There’s no crazy, wide variation and certainly no overlap.
      The PTB have their excuses ready, see if you can spot the “No evidence but we’ll make up an excuse anyway” language:

      https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/bulletins/deathsinvolvingcovid19byvaccinationstatusengland/deathsoccurringbetween2januaryand24september2021

      4. Use and interpretation of age-standardised mortality rates

      Age-standardised mortality rates (ASMRs) allow for comparison of mortality rates of populations with different age structures, as the population is standardised in five-year age groups to a standard population. Information on how ASMRs are calculated can be found in our Methodology article. Age standardisation is important when comparing mortality rates of different vaccination status groups, as the age structures of the populations differ greatly between the groups and over time.

      While the ASMRs provide evidence that vaccinated individuals have a lower risk of dying of coronavirus (COVID-19) than unvaccinated individuals, they cannot be used to determine vaccine effectiveness. This is because the populations in each vaccine status group are likely to differ in ways other than population size and age because of the selective roll out of the vaccination programme and differences in vaccine uptake. Care should be taken in interpreting trends in the ASMRs as these cannot be causally linked to vaccinations. Differences between the groups and over time, such as health status, can have a particularly large effect on the ASMRs, especially when the population becomes unrepresentative of the age group in general. This can happen if people with particular characteristics, such as poor health, remain in a particular vaccination status group.

      For example, the total mortality rate for the “21 days or more after first dose” group increases sharply from approximately week 13 to week 19 (Table 2 of the accompanying dataset). However, looking at the percentage of elderly people who are in this vaccination status group (Table 4 of the accompanying dataset), we see that this drops to very low levels around the same weeks, therefore the mortality rates are based on a very small percentage of the elderly population, which may not be representative of the elderly population in general. For example, this group may include people who did not receive a second vaccination after receiving the first because of being hospitalised for a serious condition. Similar patterns are observed for the “unvaccinated” and “within 21 days of first dose” groups at earlier times of the year. This effect is much reduced as age decreases.”

      These people can’t blame us for interpreting the data that’s in front of us. They produced it! The main confounding factor is age, and that’s taken care of by standardizing to a hypothetical European Model population — if other factors are in play they should produce evidence in the form of scientific data … instead of unquantified excuses like the above.
      Maybe they had to write that because the Nudge Unit “paid a visit” … or Boris banged his fist on the table.

      60

    • #
      FatAl

      There is a good analysis of this data at https://roundingtheearth.substack.com/p/uk-data-shows-no-all-cause-mortality

      Basically, the people claiming that the vaccinated have twice the mortality of unvaccinated have fallen into an aggregation trap that catches anyone untrained in statistics. Be wary of any statistics. Be especially wary of statistics proffered by salesmen.

      30

      • #
        Broadie

        Yes, FatAi you are on to it. This bloke hasn’t looked at the data but he warns the readers:

        This means what we are seeing is an illusion of data aggregation often called a Simpson’s paradox

        Mind you he doesn’t apply this to Covid deaths where the population was generally over 70. Now that would be a great talking point for his illusion of data aggregation.

        20

    • #
      Global Cooling

      Always look at the sample populations. Are they properly randomized? If not, there may be other factors than vaccination that makes the difference.

      Hypothesis: Unvaccinated people are healthier than vaccinated. They have less cardiovascular problems, cancer and diabetes that make the majority of deaths. C19 is rare and C19 death amount is minuscule.

      It makes sense to vaccinate sick people, not healthy children. Better still, treat the obesity pandemic.

      20

  • #
    Phillip+Charles+Sweeney

    Everyone over the age of 55 should be taking “Circadin” (Melatonin) available without prescription from your chemist since this boosts melatonin levels which decline with age.

    The decline in melatonin could also explain why the young have little risk from COVID while the elderly have a higher risk

    Circadin also helps you sleep better.

    110

  • #
    Broadie

    And the elephant in the room is?

    All patients got “standard care”, meaning they all got remdesivir, dexamethasone, and an anticoagulant

    The control in this trial were the patients that did not receive remdesivir. There is evidence remdesivir should not be used in non ventilated patients as it may cause sepsis

    Kit Knightly warns in the Off Guardian about chasing down these rabbit holes.

    Although both seem to have scientific evidence supporting them, the argument is built on a priori assumptions which concede the basic reality of the pandemic narrative.

    And you will never win if you play by those rules. This is their pandemic and they can reinvent it in any way they choose.

    Think promoting ivermectin is a good way of opposing the vaxx without alienating the believers? No!

    You have to follow rules. They don’t. They can just invent a new “variant” out of wholecloth. One that is “resistant to ivermectin”.

    And then what do you do?

    60

    • #
      Broadie

      OOPS!
      My bad, though I am unable to red thumb myself so free shot to my friends.

      All patients received the “standard care”.

      So to save face and in the pursuit of scientific method, does this mean Melatonin treats the effects of remdesivir?

      The Off Guardian is worth the read at any rate.

      50

  • #
    OldOzzie

    If the Vaccines Work, Why Aren’t They Working?

    Back to COVID vaccines. The CDC website states, “COVID-19 vaccines are safe, effective, and free.” Those three words are all relative. Let’s quickly unpack them.

    VAERS is the “Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.” From their website, one can compare adverse events from COVID vaccines from the past 11 months they have been available to adverse events from all vaccines for the past 30 years, 1990 and onward.

    Note this is 11 months versus 30 years of side effects and in most categories, the cumulative cases are similar between the two groups, despite a 30-fold time difference of data recording. Of note, hospitalizations, deaths, permanent disabilities, and birth defects were greater for 11 months of COVID vaccines than they were for 30 years of all other types of vaccines – such as shingles, influenza, measles, mumps, hepatitis, and so on.

    190

    • #
      Forrest Gardener

      A well written if troubling article. And my follow up question is why journalism produces so little similarly thought provoking content.

      60

  • #

    Might be worth a try. Tiny study though.

    23

  • #
    another ian

    Maybe another study?

    “What happened in Central Europe on Oct 10-13 so that many people started to become ill?”

    https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1462398425924780040.html

    Via http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2021/11/22/seasonal-hypothesis/

    40

    • #
      Phil O'Sophical

      Surely if it was as simple as lower hydration of the mucosal membranes, tropical countries with permanent high humidity would be subject to steady state not waves.

      00

  • #
    Philip

    Well that is good to hear because my wife is vaccinated (forced by government for job) and she also takes Melatonin

    50

  • #
    Tom Harley

    Melatonin may be harmful if you are taking Sertraline (Zoloft). My partner had a very severe reaction after first try of Melatonin, and calls to Health Department confirmed that they should not be taken together.

    50

  • #
    RoHa

    Can big American companies make enough money from it to be able to make the US govt lean on our govt? If not, forget it.

    10

  • #
    greggg

    I take melatonin not only for sleeping, but for the anti-inflammatory effect on my brain. It helps with vertigo, sensory overload and other symptoms. One supplement I struggle to leave home without.

    Some people find that they are too sedated from taking melatonin the night before. That was the case for me before I started using light therapy in the mornings. Getting more sunlight early in the day should do the trick.

    Melatonin’s Impact on Antioxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Reprogramming in Homeostasis and Disease.
    https://www.mdpi.com/2218-273X/10/9/1211/htm

    60

  • #
    Will

    I went into the PBS website to find out if Circadin (Melatonin) was still available and could not find it. So I went to the TGA website and found it there. So, I gather that it is a prescription based drug but not available on the PBS. I think, knowing the greed of all pharma, that the cost here will be a lot more than a $1.20.
    If anyone knows more, I would like to be better informed about it after the Ivermectin debacle.

    WRT the above young people have keen, aggressive immune systems that workout almost every day as every antigen is new to them. That is why their allergies are often so severe. Older people have a nice bank of antibodies etc. from their past infections and rarely meet one that they cannot slow down or beat. But, as their workouts are now rare, their immune systems are often far less aggressive and when one does pop up that has no antigenic relationship to any of the past ones, it can and does “hit the fan”.

    10

    • #
      Bill+In+Oz

      It’s readily available from Iherb
      As an over the web brouser counter supplement

      10

    • #
      Sambar

      Will,Circadin has been advertised on Victorian television over the last couple of weeks. Like all ads I did not pay attention so no details sorry.

      00

  • #
    Daniel

    List of studies on Melatonin https://c19melatonin.com/
    Choose your poison https://c19early.com

    10

  • #
    KP

    Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla has admitted that the CIA and FBI are helping the Big Pharma giant root out ‘criminals’ who spread misinformation about their multi-billion dollar company.

    “According to Bourla, people who spread misinformation on Covid-19 vaccines are “criminals” and have cost “millions of lives.”

    100percentfedup.com reports: Speaking with Washington D.C.-based think tank Atlantic Council, Bourla said there is a “very small” group of people that purposefully circulate misinformation on the shots, misleading those who are already hesitant about getting vaccinated.

    “Those people are criminals,” he told Atlantic Council CEO Frederick Kempe. “They’re not bad people. They’re criminals because they have literally cost millions of lives.”

    So, looks like we’re in trouble…

    @Will… It still easy to find. Vitamingrocer online has 100 melatonin tablets, each 10mg, for $29. So 29c a tablet. I think I’ll get some to back up my Ivermectin I’m sure I’ll need one day in the future.

    50

  • #
    Wirebird

    I understand that bats have very high amounts of melatonin. Interesting.

    20

  • #
    Kalm Keith

    Ten minutes ago I took a 2 mg tablet and am still awake.

    Just testing.

    21

  • #
    Bill+In+Oz

    Jo this is a great article. Thanks for putting it up.
    I dimly remember raising melatonin here early last year.
    I forget the source though.
    To have that conformed as a real anti Covid agent is terrific.

    I take melatonin as an anti-aging supplement.
    And take far more each night than mentioned by anyone here.
    I’ve been doing that since 2013.
    Eight years later and no ill effects at all.
    And no Covid infection either.
    Though that may be because I have not met it yet.
    But the sleep inducing aspect has faded.

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    BernardP

    Here in Canada, the unrelenting push for vaccination makes it virtually impossible to find a doctor who will agree to prescribe Ivermectin to keep in reserve in case I get Covid.

    They don’t want to *treat* Covid with Ivermectin. They don’t want to even *look* at Ivermectin, as it is perceived as an alternative to vaccination. They want to vaccinate at all costs.

    More so as we are assigned a family doctor, so we are at the mercy of his beliefs. I takes a month to get an appointment, so I needed something ready to go.

    After researching non-prescription alternatives to Ivermectin, I settled on Melatonin. I have a bottle in reserve and will take 10mg at bedtime for as long as it takes if I get Covid.

    I’m also taking 3000 IU of vitamin D daily.

    – – – – – – – – –

    Article on effectiveness of various non-prescription and prescription treatments for Covid. Melatonin is not far behind Ivermectin:

    https://www.aestheticsadvisor.com/2021/07/natural-alternatives-to-ivermectin.html

    One of the many articles I found on Melatonin use in Covid treatment. This one also discusses Vitamin D:

    https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0024320520305579

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    […] we also have other options, treatments, antivirals and weapons against Covid (like Melatonin, Vitamin D, B6, Budenoside, and of course, Ivermectin). And those other […]

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