JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Thursday Open Thread

9.5 out of 10 based on 17 ratings

265 comments to Thursday Open Thread

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    Turtle

    Absurd article by Zali Steggall in today’s Oz.

    The new buzzacronym is REST. Renewable Energy Storage Target. This rests on the tripartite idiocy of:

    1. Pumped hydro
    2. “Green hydrogen”
    3. Batteries

    Fantasy.

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      DLK

      the main power source of unreliables appears to be hopium.

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        OriginalSteve

        I think its more like BS than hopium – apparently when you dry out dung, it burns quite well.

        I suspect there is a plentifuly supply, but the smoke it generates might create more toxic fumes and lotsa CO2…

        Oh noes…what are the clueless pollies to do?

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      DLK

      can’t access due to paywall, but on twitter she says: “🌏 Zali Steggall MP: “Let us dispel the baseload myth and get serious about viable solutions such as the renewable energy storage target. Our energy future depends on it.”

      does she cite any authority for the claims that baseload power is a ‘myth’ and that renewable energy storage is ‘viable’?
      if not what are her qualifications in the relevant field of expertise?

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        Graeme#4

        Looking at her article, it’s not clear where the term REST was dredged up from. She criticises the ESB’s NEM proposal as taking too long and wants “new clean generation and storage now”. She says that that the RET legislation can be “amended to include storage at a level determined by the AEMO.” She also says: “We could create a renewable energy storage target along the lines of the renewable energy target…While the target will have to be designed carefully, we know this works.”

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          Graeme No.3

          I was wondering about that term too, but as the rest was nonsense I assumed that she had Humpty Dumpty in mind, along with The Fairy Godmother who would be essential to her fantasies.
          Also I was intereste in her claim about States with different climates, but then I thought that she hasn’t travelled further south than the NSW snow fields.

          The whole thing is garbage based on wishful thinking fantasy. Batteries, pumped storage and transmission lines all over the place, without a thought to the cost. If this is the thought processes of the Teals then the sooner they are gone the better for the country.

          And I wonder how this piece got into The Australian?

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            DLK

            And I wonder how this piece got into The Australian?

            they should not publish opinions on subjects that require expertise
            without ensuring that the material is properly referenced or providing a counter-opinion.

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              Gerry

              I’m not sure you need to be an expert to figure out that a baseload of energy production from reliable resources is necessary if the system is to be reliable …..just a modicum of common sense should do I’d have thought

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                DLK

                i don’t think expertise necessarily – because as you mention it is a matter of common knowledge – but some pointer to an opinion’s basis in fact should be provided.

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          Ted1

          …and wants “new clean generation and storage now”.

          That’s brattish!

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        DLK

        baseload power is a ‘myth’

        so,
        if your power goes out because there’s no baseload power.
        it’s not really cold and dark,
        because power failure due to lack of baseload is ‘just a myth’ (“a widely held but false belief or idea”).

        this could be the ultimate form of gaslighting (no puns where none intended).

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          r.b.

          She was elected so I suspect that it’s not widely known.

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          OriginalSteve

          Well perhaps we get people to identify as “having power” and “not freezing”…

          I mean it works for all the other make believe stuff the Left is into, but the Left seems to exhibit signs of endemic mental illness as well, so….

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        Turtle

        Yes, she thinks baseload power is a myth, but not net zero nor the notion that solar, wind, batteries, hydrogen and pumping water uphill are a substitute for coal and gas.

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        rodgerwithoutD

        Also paywalled out of article, BUT what has The Australian allowed (if any) through as Comments to this article?
        Their censorship moderations are why my $$s are still in my back pocket.

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      Barry

      The only target these bastards should have is a retail kWh price target of about 6c, being the median of the prices paid in the bottom quintile of all US and Canadian counties.

      That would get the country moving again.

      No. Other. Targets.

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      Ronin

      So the Steggles chicken thinks baseload is a myth, this will get interesting !

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      Dennis

      Don’t forget that she’s a barrister and champion skier, so with her experience she must he qualified to write about electricty generators and supply.

      And she went on a study trip at taxpayer’s expense to India where she discovered that nuclear power is too expensive and renewables are cheaper.

      /sarc.

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      David Maddison

      With the uneconomic energy consumer, Snowy Hydro 2, that just about exhausts the last options for serious pumped hydro using natural landscapes.

      Green hydrogen is a fantasy. It’s proponents are in it to harvest subsidies only. Liquid hydrogen is a nightmare even for NASA to deal with. Most rocket organisations try to avoid it, how much more so for the motorist and industrial organisations.

      Batteries are expensive and there is not enough lithium on the planet to make all the batteries required for large scale storage.

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      yarpos

      With so many working examples all around the world it should be simple matter to implement.

      This is clearly a sound basis for immediate action needed over the next 3 years.

      Zalli Stegall is clearly an energy guru at least on the level, and possibly , exceeding, the awesome experise of Chris Bowen.

      We are in good hands.

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      KP

      I’m fine with the chicken lady, I’m pally with Zali! In fact I look forward to her calling for donations, subscriptions, cake fairs and patreons to raise the money for her projects in the private sector.’

      Of course any public money should be completely banned from her being able to spend it at any time!

      (This may or may not be partly due to me commenting directly to her of some attitude she held and being subjected to a year or two of her email letters afterwards…)

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      James

      I have never seen “green” hydrogen. Seen explosive hydrogen before.

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    OldOzzie

    Serious Adverse Events of Special Interest Following mRNA Vaccination in Randomized Trials

    Results:

    Pfizer and Moderna mRNA COVID-19 vaccines were associated with an increased risk of serious adverse events of special interest, with an absolute risk increase of 10.1 and 15.1 per 10,000 vaccinated over placebo baselines of 17.6 and 42.2 (95% CI -0.4 to 20.6 and -3.6 to 33.8), respectively. Combined, the mRNA vaccines were associated with an absolute risk increase of serious adverse events of special interest of 12.5 per 10,000 (95% CI 2.1 to 22.9). The excess risk of serious adverse events of special interest surpassed the risk reduction for COVID-19 hospitalization relative to the placebo group in both Pfizer and Moderna trials (2.3 and 6.4 per 10,000 participants, respectively).

    Discussion:

    The excess risk of serious adverse events found in our study points to the need for formal harm-benefit analyses, particularly those that are stratified according to risk of serious COVID-19 outcomes such as hospitalization or death.

    Note:

    Funding Information: This study had no funding support.

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      OldOzzie

      Worse Than the Disease? Reviewing Some Possible Unintended Consequences of the mRNA Vaccines Against COVID-19

      Stephanie Seneff1 and Greg Nigh21 Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, MIT, Cambridge MA, 02139, USA,

      ABSTRACT

      Operation Warp Speed brought to market in the United States two mRNA vaccines, produced by Pfizer and Moderna. Interim data suggested high efficacy for both of these vaccines, which helped legitimize Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) by the FDA. However, the exceptionally rapid movement of these vaccines through controlled trials and into mass deployment raises multiple safety concerns. In this review we first describe the technology underlying these vaccines in detail. We then review both components of and the intended biological response to these vaccines, including production of the spike protein itself, and their potential relationship to a wide range of both acute and long-term induced pathologies, such as blood disorders, neurodegenerative diseases and autoimmune diseases. Among these potential induced pathologies, we discuss the relevance of prion-protein-related amino acid sequences within the spike protein. We also present a brief review of studies supporting the potential for spike protein “shedding”, transmission of the protein from a vaccinated to an unvaccinated person, resulting in symptoms induced in the latter.We finish by addressing a common point of debate, namely, whether or not these vaccines could modify the DNA of those receiving the vaccination. While there are no studies demonstrating definitively that this is happening, we provide a plausible scenario, supported by previously established pathways for transformation and transport of genetic material, whereby injected mRNA could ultimately be incorporated into germ cell DNA for transgenerational transmission. We conclude with our recommendations regarding surveillance that will help to clarify the long-term effects of these experimental drugs and allow us to better assess the true risk/benefit ratio of these novel technologies.

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        Zane

        No one has yet shown convincing evidence that a new disease called COVID-19 actually exists. Various flulike symptoms, PCR tests, and common and uncommon colds don’t count.

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          Zane, we know corruption is everywhere, yet some things are incredibly hard to fake. Among all the lies are some truths. Ponder that we are probably in a biotech hot war, and ask yourself if its possible that China (or dark factions in the US) have the capability of selecting/creating a spreadable pnumonia with genetic technology (they do).

          Please look at Nextstrain the opensource github you can see all the strains and clades, the branching steps, and you can mouseover each and every dot and find out the name of the person who did the sample, the lab, the nation, the mutations, and it’s all there. Scroll on and see the number of the mutations for every single 29,000 base in the Covid RNA sequence. See the national clade maps.

          Know that these reports are backed up and cross checked with plaque assay data which estimates viral loads down to a single viral unit per ml. There are also electronmicrograph photos of virions, plus unique “glass” xrays, blood tests (Eg d-dimer etc which show it is not influenza). Plus hundreds of thousands of patients and doctors and nurses and contact tracing data backed up with genetic full sequence assay so we could follow the cause and effect cycles of infection. Sure sometimes the flu looks the same, and Omicron has become not much different to a cold, but the original Wu-Flu (same as Wu-Flu vaccine spikes) can be quite toxic.

          I’d suggest you start by learning what a plaque assay is.

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            Forrest Gardener

            Jo what you write is beyond my ability to understand but I take it that you are either saying that a sample of the virus has been isolated intact or that there is no need to do so. That after all is the basis of the complaint that the virus does not exist.

            My question however comes from your statement that omicron has become not much different to a cold. What explains the continuing daily figures at covidlive.com.au? For example Victoria today has 411 in hospital, 23 in ICU and 11 on ventilators. That sounds very different to a cold to me.

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              MP

              She is saying it has been proven by the hundreds of thousands of dancing nurses. She was disinfecting her groceries and probably still is.
              What is the normal hospital load for those for the same period say 2019, been nothing out of the ordinary for the last 4 years. But this year will be different.

              Heard Mr. Gates state, “they didn’t know back at the start it would be the same as flu” or something like that. Trust the experts!

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                Saighdear

                Hmm, I hate those pharases ‘they didn’t know back at the start it’ what EXACTLY did they mean by “didn’t know” – did they set out to intentionally do something, OR were they the vicitim who didn’t know ( ie hadn’t learnt -the knowledge ) what was about to happen. .. the game of politics, in my book. When the courtroom judge asks “did you know….” what’s the right answer ? ( and it’s not always the correct answer, is it? )

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                Forrest Gardener, to all intents and purposes the virus has been shown to exist through multiple cross-checked ways, and independently. With full source code we can follow infections from one person to another, across countries, in a timely sequence, backed with security camera footage, phone tracking, contact tracer data, with blood tests, doc observations, and we know that if we take a sample of their saliva, whatever is in it, will have a 29,000 RNA base sequence that matches, and we will be able to dilute it methodically and put it on trays of cells that are vulnerable and at the right dilution we will see a single circle of dead cells cause by what presumably was one single live virus. We know we can take electron micrograph photos of that sample and see the same little balls. We know we can stain those little balls with antibodies that have very exact shapes, and which will not bind to influenza or RSV or paramyxovirus or adenovirus…. And we can find the exact antibodies in former people who claimed to suffer certain symptoms or who tested positive asymptomatically.

                It may or may not fit some historic 1850 definition of isolation but can can anyone explain the observations I’ve listed with a better easier explanation? And then there is the question no one answers, are we or are not in a Biotech War with the CCP? To deny the virus is to deny the war. Maybe that’s correct, but all parts of this reality need to add up.

                I’m saying that the data and observations are so substantial, so cross checked, counter tested, by independent sources, methods, people, vested interests, individuals, it becomes hard to imagine how it could even be possible to competently fake it. But I’m open to suggestion. I’ve yet to see anyone even try to explain how all these different tests in detail could be manipulated to create this illusion.

                Occams razor.

                We know Big Pharma cheat for profit. But it would take a conspiracy of Truman proportions where more than half the world was “in on it” with outright lies, fabrication and corruption so well organised there would need to be a 24/7 global central coordinating office that phoned all the players every day to keep the lies consistent. In real life, conspiracies this big leak like sieves, and incompetence produces mistakes.

                Everyone keeps pointing at the CT misuse of PCR. OK. But where are the mistakes in blood tests, saliva tests, symptom lists, x-rays, viral plaque assays, antibodies tests, T-cell binding, ELISA tests, contact tracing, NExtstain open source branching patterns.

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              Peter C

              I take it that you are either saying that a sample of the virus has been isolated intact or that there is no need to do so

              I have been trying to understand some of this. One the one hand; there are these who say that “The Virus has Not Been Isolated and Purified”, and on the other hand there are those who say that the Viral Genome is totally known, hence Isolation and Purification are unnecessary.

              My questions are: Has the Virus been Isolated and Purified? If not how can the Genome be established?

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                Forrest Gardener

                Hopefully Jo will chime in to clarify. For all I know I’m not even asking the right question.

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                Zane

                Seems I opened a can of worms:).

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                Forrest Gardener

                Your point was certainly worth making. What’s your source for saying that the virus has not been isolated?

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                Saighdear

                The more you (thought) you know, and the more you ( thought) you learnt, it becomes more difficult to ask pertinent questions in oirder to learn more. and if you DON’t KNOW at all, then where do you begin? Assumptions and Presumptions and listening to the idiots. The “Learned” have told the “Educated” but no one has listened to the “Experienced”. ….

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                The virus has been isolated and purified and visualised and chrystalised and cultured and everything else that has been done with lots of other viruses. Live viruses can be transported from lab to lab.

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                Forrest Gardener

                GI if only you did not have such strong negative credibility or occasionally demonstrated some scientific knowledge.

                Hint: you need to provide links to support anything you say. Otherwise people will just believe the opposite.

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                Has the Virus been Isolated and Purified? If not how can the Genome be established?

                The amazing thing about PCR is that it can pull out sequences from a chemical soup. We don’t need to isolate the bacteria and viruses and your cells, we can put in coded sections that will seek out and only bind to one or the other and there are commercial tests now which will assay your entire gut flora from one sample. There may be 1000 different organisms, but if we know the code for each of them we can make a test that will identify which ones are there. We can only do that because of the incredible lock and key chemical binding of DNA. It really helps if you understand the double helix structure and the code. It all makes so much more sense. It’s like computer code, but 4 bases not 2. (They are A G C T for short) Unlike computer code those 4 bases will bind to a “mirror” sequence. “A” always binds T. T always binds A. C always binds G, G always binds C. This mirror sequence is the chemical back up copy.

                Chemically the sequence AATAATAATAATAAT will stick like glue to TTATTATTATTATTA. (or any mirror variation where the A and T are opposite, and the G and C are), Eg GGGGGGGGCCCCCC would stick to CCCCCCCCGGGGGG. The specificity is remarkable. There are error bars of course, always false pos and false neg, but under all that is this extraordinary ability for us to make a chemical code that sticks to a very specific target.

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              yarpos

              Keep in mind that each year in normal times a couple of thousand people die of influenza and pneumonia in VIC (and NSW also), and many more thousands get seriously ill. Nobody used to bat an eyelid at that apart from saying things like “its a bad flu season” Now because we have Covid and websites that keep score we express concern over numbers that aren’t that great in the context of 6 million people or previous experience.

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                Forrest Gardener

                Sounds reasonable. Do you have any information about current hospital patient numbers for respiratory illnesses?

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                Yarpos, that is true of the current form of Covid — omicron. However the fatality rates for the earlier variants are a lot higher than the seaonsal flu. Fortunately they were lower than the Spanish H1N1 Flu.

                Attack rates for Covid are higher because there was no prior immunity. Even if it has the same fatality rate as influenza it would threaten to overwhelm hospital systems due to attack rate. In any wave fo influenza, many people have prior immunity. The Ro is only 1.4. Just nothing like early Covid at an Ro of 3 and Delta was 5 or 6!

                But there is a lot we don’t know about the CCP/Fauci bioweapon nature of Covid. Does it affect fertility? Cause long term immunity loss? Increase risk of dementia? All this is possible with a bioweapon. There may be a long term downside. That’s why I would never go out of my way to catch Covid, especially those early variants.

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              Forrest Gardener

              Jo, I can’t see a way to respond to your exposition so I’ll just say it here. I value any day where I learn somthing. Thanks so much for taking the time to set your reasons out so clearly.

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        • #

          Interesting video from David Icke goes over most of the points
          https://www.bitchute.com/video/Pyinq5nsUXNw/
          David Icke there is no Virus

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          • #

            Kevin there is a lot more to microbiology. These videos use 0.001% of the data and ignore all the other tests / methods / techniques. And in comments I have already explained the multiple problems with most of his points.

            1. Flu disappeared — as I predicted and posted and as is standard microbiology. Any disease with an Ro of 1.4 will vanish with restrictions that are applied to a disease with an Ro of 2 – 10. Whatever slows down the more infectious disease will defacto wipe out the less spreadable disease.
            2. We know SARS and Flu diseases are different. Not only do we have Antibody tests / Eliza / PCR / electronmicrographs etc, we know that Covid does something awful to lungs (or it did in the early waves, not with omicron) that showed up as different on a chest x-ray. We know that D-Dimer levels, blood clots and vascular problems are rife with Covid, but not with influenza. Likewise cognitive problems are much more common, and unbelievably low record breaking O2 blood oxygen saturation levels. It’s not “the flu”. Flu doesn’t suddenly get bad on Day 8 like SARS 2 did. The normal ARDS treatment for Flu killed people because SARS is not ARDS and the ICU docs tried the wrong things (eg ventilators) because they assumed covid was like influenza. It’s not the same disease, not even close, though it has evolved into something that is now more like a common respiratory disease.
            3. Yes, the CDC has retracted one PCR assay, but the FDA has approved no less than 281 different diagnostic tests for Covid. See them all listed here: https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/coronavirus-disease-2019-covid-19-emergency-use-authorizations-medical-devices/in-vitro-diagnostics-euas-molecular-diagnostic-tests-sars-cov-2
            4. Yes Big Pharma are corrupt. Yes they lied about a lot. But it is vastly easier to release a real virus and hype it, distort it and profit from it than it is to create a fake universe where all the doctors patients hospitals and pathologists are fooled or liars. Occams razor begs.

            Please read my replies. When you talk to a doctor there is so much you could say that will get their attention but the Icke and Bailey type material will make it hard for you to influence medically trained people. The doc will nod and tune you out. We really need you to speak up, I want your voice to be heard.

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      Earl

      Looking back at the 50s/60s when vaccines were making great inroads on disease we had one for chicken pox and one for polio.
      Fast forward to recent times and we have a new type of inoculation. We also have a goverment tv ad campaign on how 1in3 oldies will get shingles because of something that has reactivated the chicken pox virus and it manifests as scabies. Today the Daily Mail announces “The fight to contain UK’s polio outbreak”. It is only some 19 years since Great Britain was declared free of polio in 2003. Thank goodness for mRNA inoculations that can be mass produced and pumped into people faster than the old egg incubation method. Oh and thank goodness for our drug companies jumping in and pushing to inoculate children as young as a few months old against this covid thingy even though they are a very low danger group from that disease whereas polio…

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        OldOzzie

        National incident declared over polio virus findings in London sewage

        The London samples detected since February raised the alarm because they were related to one another and contained mutations that suggested the virus was evolving as it spreads from person to person.

        The outbreak is believed to have been triggered by a person returning to the UK after having the oral polio vaccine and spreading it locally. It is unclear how much the virus has spread, but it may be confined to a single household or an extended family.

        Poliovirus can spread through poor hand hygiene and contaminated food and water, or less often through coughs and sneezes. A common route of transmission is for people to get contaminated hands after using the toilet and then pass the virus on by touching food consumed by others.

        While the UK generally has good uptake of the polio vaccine, with 95% of five-year-olds having had the jab, coverage lags behind in London, with only 91.2% of children vaccinated in that age bracket. In response to the detection of the virus, the NHS will contact parents of children who are not up to date with their polio vaccinations.

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          OldOzzie

          Immunisation status of UK-bound refugees between January, 2018, and October, 2019: a retrospective, population-based cross-sectional study

          Migrants, including forced migrants such as refugees, could be an undervaccinated group globally and face barriers to accessing vaccination systems and catch-up vaccines. A systematic review by Mipatrini and colleagues has previously shown that migrants to Europe are underimmunised for several key vaccine-preventable diseases; another study by Deal and colleagues has shown that outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases have occurred among refugees and migrants residing in temporary camps or reception centres in the European context

          This retrospective cross-sectional analysis explored for the first time the immunisation coverage of a specific group of migrants—refugees within a formal resettlement programme—being resettled in the UK. Our results show that more than one in ten refugees depart for the UK with no recorded polio-containing vaccine, and almost one in five with no recorded measles-containing vaccines, suggesting they will require catch-up vaccination services on arrival in the UK. We found adult and adolescent refugees are less likely to have recorded immunisations for key vaccines compared with children on departure to the UK, suggesting targeted initiatives on arrival to the UK are warranted.

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        John Connor II

        I posted recently on Polio and WHO’S claim of eradication decades ago.
        It’s back in the UK now eh…
        Cases this year are wild Polio from Pakistan and the gutter water Polio contamination in India.
        No sign of significant spread but given how old diseases are making surprise comebacks, rocky times lay ahead on the disease front.
        Looking at global data, Monkeypox is centre stage and Covid is almost nothing in comparison.

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          Earl

          “…but given how old diseases are making surprise comebacks”

          When the shingles reports came out of Israel early on in the inoculation process and then suddenly Australian govt ran shingle ads on tv I commented on this site that I hoped we wouldn’t see other diseases we were previously vaxed against come out again like polio. It seemed strange that in 34 years of watching Australian tv I had never seen shingles ads then suddenly…. The official direction was that 1 in 3 of us could expect shingles as we get older because if you had chicken pox (varicella-zoster) the virus stays dormant in your system until such time as you become “immunocompromised” and the derivative virus herpes zoster impacts in the form of shingles.

          The polio vax was/is delivered in two forms an injection (using inactivated polio virus) and orally (using weakened live polio virus). Oral is given in 3rd world countries because it is easier to manage without need for sterilized needles. Of the 3 types of polio virus type 2 was “eradicated” first however it seems the same vax kept being used which may have led to cases of “vaccine-derived polio”.

          The oral vax ceased being given in Britain from 2004 however there would be a good supply of 19-year old+ people who got the live oral vaccine. Problem is the oral goes to the intestine to do its work and can be shed through faeces. Then if you have poor hygiene and low vax rates chances of an outbreak increase.

          As recently as September 2020 the Who were reporting on “vaccine-derived polio” outbreak in Chad and spreading to Cameroon. And guess what in October 2021 the Who also reported on a type 2 case in Ukraine!

          Starting to see any links forming yet?

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        Geoff Sherrington

        Shingles. There is a vaccine. Use it.
        Too many people get postherpetic neuralgia.
        This is a painful condition than can last the rest of your life. Even shorten it, certainly reduce its quality. Imagine the pain of a tooth ache that lasts forever more. Geoff S

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    el+gordo

    Advanced models see La Nina rebounding.

    ‘Due to the likelihood of the La Nina persisting through Q3 of 2022, the Nino34 SSTA forecast by the NCEP CFS V2 model indicates short-term transition to neutral phase followed by La Nina returning.’ (Climate Impact Company)

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    OldOzzie

    Mak Siccar says:
    June 23, 2022 at 11:51 am

    Bandt’s flag rejection too serious to dismiss as stunt
    EDITORIAL

    12:00AM JUNE 23, 2022

    The refusal of Greens leader Adam Bandt and Victorian Greens senator Lidia Thorpe, an Indigenous woman, to stand in front of the national flag raises important questions for taxpayers. Given the pair’s evident loathing for the nation, who are they really representing in return for their $210,000-plus salaries? In defending her leader in radio, television and newspaper interviews over his disgraceful removal of the Australian flag from behind him at press conferences, Senator Thorpe made a telling revelation of her own about why she was in the Senate: “I’m there to infiltrate” what she described as “the colonial project”.

    Senator Thorpe describing the national flag as an “obscenity” was offensive. The flag did not represent her or her people, she said. It had “no permission to be here”; there had been no consent or treaty. It had connotations of “invasion, dispossession’’ associated with mass murders of many men, women and children”. Her reasons for seeking office would strike many who pay her salary as bizarre. She swore allegiance to “the colonising Queen” to gain access to the media and to parliament. She wanted to question the “illegitimate occupation” and for people to know “whose land they’re on”. The first people “never ceded sovereignty”. It was “time to treaty”.

    The two Greens MPs’ views are anathema to Australians who love the flag for its representation of the nation’s heritage and for its Southern Cross and Commonwealth Star. Degrading a highly valued symbol is galling to those who have served the nation and its values fighting under the flag or who have lost mates or loved ones doing so. RSL Australia president Greg Melick said Mr Bandt’s action was “unfitting of a member of our national parliament”. Australians had served under the flag irrespective of race, religion or politics, The Greens’ unpatriotic, shameful behaviour is likely to prompt some people to buy and wear small flag pins. Anthony Albanese is correct when he says every parliamentarian should be proud to stand in front of the national flag. Mr Bandt’s action, the Prime Minister said, risked undermining the move for reconciliation.

    But in a healthy sign of national unity, some of the most potent criticisms of Mr Bandt and Senator Thorpe have come from prominent Indigenous people, including serving and former elected MPs. Indigenous Labor MP Marion Scrymgour said Mr Bandt’s divisive act would make it harder to win broad community support for a constitutionally enshrined voice to parliament. Indigenous leader Warren Mundine said he was “flabbergasted” by Senator Thorpe’s comments and asked: “So is she there to blow the place up? It is just bizarre.” Australia’s first Indigenous cabinet minister, Ken Wyatt, called on Mr Bandt to rethink. “The Australian flag has the Southern Cross on it, and the Southern Cross story in many Aboriginal cultures is significant and it’s an important symbol,” Mr Wyatt said. “In Aboriginal astronomy it is a very sacred set of stars.” Aboriginal men and women had died fighting under the flag, he said, and that should be respected.

    Incoming Northern Territory Country Liberal Party senator Jacinta Price said Senator Thorpe had “nothing but contempt for the Australian people”. Senator Thorpe “doesn’t see herself as an Australian, she doesn’t see herself as being represented by the Australian flag”. She was not the right person to represent the Australian people, Ms Price said. Nor did Senator Thorpe’s comments indicate she had Australia’s best interests at heart. Ms Price wants Governor-General David Hurley to look closely at Senator Thorpe’s intentions “and consider whether this is possible grounds for dismissal”. Some have dismissed Mr Bandt’s antics as a stunt, but that misses the point. His disrespectful action, and Senator Thorpe’s comments, attack the essence of our nation. Coming from elected MPs they are intolerable. All parties should condemn them now and at the next election.

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    OldOzzie

    Salvatore, Understaffed & Overworked Martyr to Govt Covid Stupidity says:
    June 23, 2022 at 11:32 am

    cohenite says: June 23, 2022 at 10:51 am

    There is a whole generation who are removed from the constraints and exigencies of nature. A social infrastructure unparalleled in human history has been built up to insulate this generation from nature. They enjoy every advantage which was not available to people even 60 years ago:

    Honest responses/answers please.

    60 yrs ago how many housewives would (even if no longer doing) have the following;

    – Been unable to kill & dress a chook.
    – Been unable to cope with living in a dwelling that had only an outdoor dunny.
    – Been unfamiliar with household health threats from significant hygiene issues (eg, sewage [dunny], poultry going “off”, various rotten “stuff”, poorly treated wounds, etc)
    – Been unable to make clothing.
    – Been unable to make jumpers, beanies, socks & darn same.
    – Been unable to bake a cake from scratch ingredients.
    – Been unfamiliar with a wringer or a mangle.
    – Had known life without an electric refrigerator.
    – Been unfamiliar with living in a house that contained at least one firearm.

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    OldOzzie

    Tesla Model S catches fire three weeks after getting sent to junkyard

    Firefighters ended up submerging the car in a water-filled pit

    In what sounds like the automotive equivalent of The Walking Dead, a Tesla Model S caught fire three weeks after it was involved in an accident and sent to a junkyard. Firefighters had a difficult time putting out the blaze, and they ended up having to submerge the battery.

    Posting on its official Twitter account, the Metro Fire Department of Sacramento explained that it sent crews to extinguish a vehicle fire in a wrecking yard. When they got there, firefighters found a burning Model S that had been wrecked in a non-fire-related accident about three weeks before. Why the electric sedan caught fire after sitting for nearly a month is unclear, but Metro Fire says the Tesla put up a fight.

    “Crews knocked the fire down but it kept re-igniting/off-gassing in the battery compartment,” it wrote on Twitter.

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    Sceptical+Sam

    This, hopefully, will get interesting.

    A public debate on the so-called science behind CAGW and the devil, CO2.

    In the letters section of “The Australian” today:

    No, Jane Bieger (Letters, 21/6), climate change is not just a “hypothesis”. The causal relationship between carbon dioxide and climate change has been understood by scientists since 1856 and accepted science since 1893, but more importantly was first proven in a laboratory in 1977 by Exxon Petroleum, an achievement that they are happy to boast of.

    This work was replicated by our own CSIRO two years later and details published in The Greenhouse Effect by Professor GI Pearman, then CSIRO head. It is correct that models and forecasts that have been published since 1893 have not been accurate as they have consistently understated the rate of global warming.

    Barry Harrod, Fig Tree Pocket, Qld

    I can’t wait to see if “The Australian” will facilitate the discussion that has eluded all areas of public communication up to date.

    Put up or shut up time has arrived.

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      David Maddison

      The whole foundation of the anthropogenic global warming fraud is that trace amounts of CO2, less than 400ppm can dramatically alter global climate in a devestating, but this hypothesis never seems to have been rigorously tested or proven.

      You’d think that a claim used to de-electrify and de-industrialise the West and that has resulted in the expenditure of trillions of dollars, to the point that it has created an Existential Threat for Western Civilisation itself, would demand rigourous proof.

      So where is it?

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      Kevin Kilty

      It is correct that models and forecasts that have been published since 1893 have not been accurate as they have consistently understated the rate of global warming.

      Uh, huh. This seems exactly backward. Any number of people have demonstrated evidence that the models over estimate warming — such as this. By the way, people wondered why I employed data ending in 2014. The reason was that this particular figure showed dashed lines attempting to repair the departure between models and reality, but which still failed a process-control analysis.

      I’d love to analyze the experiments that have claimed to have proven the greenhouse effect. Seim and Olsen claim to have disproved it through experiments — but I think there are all sorts of problems with their experiment. I have no doubt about the reality of the greenhouse effect, but I doubt it can be duplicated credibly in a laboratory because of scaling issues. Do you have any reference for either the Exxon or CSIRO experiment?

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        RickWill

        I have no doubt about the reality of the greenhouse effect,

        GHE can be whatever you want. It is the same as believing in an all powerful God. However whatever you believe it to be, the one think it cannot be is to have any impact on Earth’s energy balance or climate. CO2 has some indirect impact through planet greening that intensifies the water cycle.

        The fact is that open ocean water cannot sustain more than 30C. No climate model has this hard limit and all CMIP3 models are provably wrong for their 2020 predictions in the Nino34 region of the Pacific.

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          Chris

          Co2’s influence is much more than an “indirect impact.” When photosynthesis occurs and CO2 molecules and a H2O molecules break down and reform as a carbohydrate C6 H12 O6, the excess O2 molecules released into the atmosphere comes from the water. Photosynthesis is the only method that free oxygen enters the atmosphere. As you know Oxygen levels must remain in a very narrow percentage band. Too low and every life form will have trouble breathing and too high and everything will burn in an unstoppable fire.
          Apart from being an essential ingredient for the formation of rocks, shells and birds eggs , Co2 dissolves in water to form a very weak acid which in turn dissolves silica. This dissolved silica is used by diatoms to make thick cell walls. Diatoms are a single cell phytoplankton which photosynthesises to grow and reproduce and of course to release free oxygen into the atmosphere. Our Co2 levels influence our O2 levels. Life on Earth depends on it.

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            RickWill

            Our Co2 levels influence our O2 levels. Life on Earth depends on it.

            Which has no direct influence on climate; rather indirect.

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          Kevin Kilty

          This is a very puzzling remark…

          GHE can be whatever you want. It is the same as believing in an all powerful God.

          I have no idea what point you are trying to make. I hope it is not that the greenhouse effect does not exist. However, while I agree with you that the greenhouse effect cannot impact energy balance (solar input must equal longwave output over a suitable time span), it does have a substantial impact on near surface temperature, and if you will admit that temperature is a factor in weather and climate, then it follows that IR active vapors/gases have an impact on weather and climate too.

          The greenhouse effect is no different in principle than heat transfer within a furnace or boiler containing products of combustion (water vapor and CO2). Any mechanical engineer disputing that the combustion products do not have an impact on surface temperature within the enclosure should probably re-take the heat transfer course.

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      Graeme#4

      The early dates seem to be wrong, as they don’t include the Arrhenius paper, released in April 1896, and which is judged to be the first paper to quantify the contribution of CO2 to the Greenhouse Effect. An interesting side comment by the translator, who points out that in this oft-quoted paper, Arrhenius does not explicitly suggest that the burning of fossil fuels will cause global warming.

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        Graeme No.3

        No, because Arrhenius was trying to explain the end of the various Ice Ages (geological usage) and thought that 5% CO2 in the atmosphere would so that. It wasn’t known then about The Snowball Earth a billion+ years previously when the CO2 level was quite high.

        And I notice that John Tyndall doesn’t get a mention for 1860 when it has been regarded for many years as the discovery of CO2 absorbing InfraRed (he referred to them as Heat Rays). Reported in the Proceedings of the Royal Society along with another paper reporting the rapid loss of heat by CO2,

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      Sceptical+Sam

      There have been a number of encouraging responses to the nonsense pushed by Barry Harrod’s (whoever he is) letter in today’s “The Australian”.

      https://www.theaustralian.com.au/commentary/letters/putting-price-on-carbon-wont-put-pause-on-blackouts/news-story/ea0c12aa885341ed27d63d6c40b3ba9e

      How good is “The Australian” newspaper for running a reader commentary on this topic.

      For the benefit of those on Jo’s site who can’t access the discussion I’ve pulled out a couple of my favourite extracts for your enjoyment:

      1. Thomas with 23 likes: “There is no scientific paper in any refereed scientific journal proving conclusively that CO2 produced by human activity is driving the climate. However, there is massive conclusive empirical evidence that climate is a natural variable, with variations caused by a multitude of truly powerful factors and CO2 is not one of them. “Climate change” is indeed not just a hypothesis. It is very real but the proposition that humans are driving climate change to any statistically significant extent is indeed an unproven hypothesis, as Professor Ian Plimer, with powerful reasoning, has cogently and correctly argued. “

      2. Hunter with 32 likes: “Jane Beiger is correct to say that the current mild warming (some 1.5 C over some 150 years is hardly a crisis according to acclaimed climate scientist Richard Lindzen) is not entirely understood…is it natural cycles or entirely man made? It is certainly not entirely man made and Climatologist Judith Curry gives a very good explanation in one of her lectures where she suggest the story we hear every other day is a gross oversimplification and the true situation is not fully understood.”

      3. Peter with 28 likes: “Complex problem + simple solution = idiocy.”

      They’re all on the money and reflect the general tone of all the responses.

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    David Maddison

    I think the war against Western Civilisation has been won by the Left.

    We now face a most horrible future which will be a dystopian society somewhat akin to a terrible combination of Orwell’s “Nineteen Eighty Four” and Well’s “The Time Machine” with a society ruled by Morlocks.

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    OldOzzie

    Bill Gates’ land purchase triggers probe

    Trusts and corporations can’t own ranches or farmland in North Dakota, state authorities say

    North Dakota’s attorney general has sent a letter to Red River Trust, an outfit linked to billionaire Bill Gates, over its recent purchase of a large potato farm. Attorney General Drew Wrigley’s office warned the trust of potential violations of state and federal law and asked for more information, it was confirmed on Wednesday.

    Corporations or limited liability companies are “prohibited from owning or leasing farmland or ranchland in the state of North Dakota,” or “engaging in farming or ranching,” said the letter sent by Wrigley’s office sent a letter to Red River Trust’s offices in Kansas, the outlet AgWeek reported on Wednesday.

    The letter’s existence was confirmed by the Bismarck-based TV station KFYR, which published a copy of the first page. A copy of the letter, dated June 21, was also sent to Campbell Farms offices in Grafton, North Dakota. AgWeek revealed on June 13 that Red River had bought the company from the brothers Bill, Greg and Tom Campbell in November 2021, and paid $13.5 million for 2,100 acres of their potato-farming operation.

    ates, who made his fortune at Microsoft, retired to pursue a variety of pet causes – from vaccines around the world to buying up land in the US – through the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Gates has suggested his interest in agriculture had to do with seeds and biofuel, and advocated for switching to synthetic meat as a way to combat climate change.

    Using a network of corporations, trusts and asset management companies, the former software mogul had acquired more than 240,000 acres (over 97,000 hectares) of farmland as of 2021, with LandReport.com dubbing him becoming “America’s top farmland owner.”

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    OldOzzie

    US Navy teaches its personnel about gender pronouns

    Military personnel are being taught how to cultivate ‘safe spaces’ through the use of ‘inclusive language’ in a training video

    A training video posted by the US Navy suggests that its members are being taught how to correctly use gender pronouns and “inclusive language” to create “safe spaces” for LGBT staff.

    The instructional video in the style of a children’s show, denoted as an “Official US Navy Video”, was uploaded to the Defense Visual Information Distribution Service by Air Force staff sergeant John Vannucci late last month, but has only now begun spreading online.

    Presented by Naval Undersea Warfare Center engineers Jony Rozon and Conchy Vasquez, the nearly four-minute video explains how to use “inclusive language” to create “a safe space for everybody.”

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    OldOzzie

    Buyer beware: The choice between land tax and stamp duty

    Karl Fitzgerald, the advocacy director at Prosper Australia, is a strong believer in the benefits of replacing property stamp duty with a broad-based land tax.

    But he has a warning for first-home buyers attracted to the Perrottet government’s proposal for an opt-in annual land tax to replace stamp duty on transactions up to $1.5 million.

    “Our detailed work on the ACT stamp duty to land tax transition shows that homemakers were more willing to overpay when bidding for a home,” he said.

    “The risk with this (NSW) policy is that it will put upward pressure on prices. First-home buyers will have $50,000 in stamp duty savings that may simply find its way into a higher purchasing bid.”

    Fitzgerald has touched on the irony of the NSW budget, handed down on Tuesday: the centrepiece of a so-called housing affordability budget could actually support, or even increase, house prices in markets underpinned by first-home buyers.

    State governments, and by omission federal governments too, have let stamp duty rise to such outrageous levels that most of us don’t understand the true incidence of the tax.

    Economist and current Henry Halloran research fellow at the University of Sydney, Cameron Murray, nailed the tax in a post this week, saying that stamp duty is a tax on sellers, not purchasers.

    Home sellers will be big winners

    On a $1.4 million home purchase, the stamp duty is $61,200. In effect, the buyer is prepared to pay – and must have the capacity to pay – $1,461,200 for the home. But $61,200 goes to NSW Revenue, not the seller.

    Remove the transfer duty and the extra $61,200 could go to the seller.

    “We expect that home sellers will be the big winners from this announcement, enjoying a demand-side fillip during a softening market,” said Fitzgerald.

    “Public education will be key for younger buyers who may not grasp the implications of an annual land tax.”

    Of course, financiers should add the property tax to living costs and adjust loans, and capacity to pay, accordingly.

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      David Maddison

      Land tax and stamp duty, like all wealth taxes are immoral firms of taxation.

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        Dennis

        Our State Governments would prefer us to have forgotten that in return for distribution of the GST revenue 100 per cent to the States and Territories, based on a mutually agreed formula that requires the majority to agree to change, the States agreed to abolish several State imposed taxes including stamp duty and payroll tax. After the 10 per cent GST was established, and the Federal revenue Wholesale Sales Tax up to 27.5 per cent was abolished, the States ignored most of the taxes they promised to remove.

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      Sceptical+Sam

      Another example of government “double dipping”.

      You bought your house X number of years ago. You paid the Stamp Duty at the full rate.

      Government now wants to abolish Stamp Duty and, as a home owner, requires you to pay again via the Land Tax rip-off.

      The solution:

      If Land Tax is to be introduced it should grandfather all those who have already paid via the Stamp Duty on the original purpose. So, only when the Stamp Dutied property is sold should it be subjected to the Land Tax regime.

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    OldOzzie

    Families to pay double for electricity thanks to a net zero climate change policy with $3,200 bills expected – and that’s before electric cars put pressure on the grid

    – Institute of Public Affairs predicts 103 per cent surge in electricity bills by 2030
    – Think tank said retail prices would double as six coal-fired plants were closed
    – Predicted decommissioning baseload power would quadruple wholesale costs

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    OldOzzie

    ‘Mad Max’ apocalypse vehicles spied as filming begins

    Movie cars have been spotted as filming kicks off for the latest Mad Max instalment in parts of NSW.

    The first spy photos of the next Mad Max film have appeared as production returns to Australia.

    Director George Miller has begun filming for Furiosa, a prequel of the 2015 movie Mad Max: Fury Road starring Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron, with The Queen’s Gambit lead Anya Taylor-Joy playing a young Furiosa alongside Chris Hemsworth.

    Journalist and photographer John Veage captured these images of the set at Kurnell, around 30km south of Sydney’s CBD, where the former sand mine is being used – the same location where primary filming for Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome occurred in 1985.

    Filming is also said to be occurring in Hay, in the Riverina region of south-west New South Wales, as well as in an area outside of Broken Hill, in the state’s far west.

    Images published by The Daily Mail show a 1948 Buick Special known as ‘Polecat #7’ together with an early iteration of ‘Claw Car #1’, a 1980 Ford F-250 tow truck, both of which appeared in Fury Road.

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      David Maddison

      I think we’re not so far from a real life Mad Max scenario…

      And just yesterday I saw a Kawasaki Z1000 motorcycle on the road with an MFP (Main Force Patrol) logo.

      Like this: https://pin.it/7VpGW9a

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      Zane

      If they need anyone with a tungsten metallic Subaru Outback in any chase scenes, I’m the man!

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      robert rosicka

      Last one they filmed in the USA ? Because there had been good rainfall and the normally dry areas were green , will be the same this time although I think it’s been dry around the Hay / Ivanhoe area .

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      lyntonio

      The ’48 Buick had a straight 8 engine, silky smooth, massive torque (leave it in top) up hills etc.
      Downside was broken crankshafts.
      First time I was in one, the driver turned the key on, put both hands on the wheel, and the car started.
      Had a foot start, where the starter solenoid was engaged mechanically. (similar to the dip switches of the day).
      Beautiful car.

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        Geoff Sherrington

        With our Buick straight 8, we could select top gear, feet off all pedals, press start button and glide away. Great torque. Clutch on starter motor, not like modern cars. Geoff S

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    RickWill

    This linked site has an interesting perspective on the requirement for battery storage:
    https://sites.google.com/view/mostly-renewable-nem/home?fbclid=IwAR0ey_D2atuc-7Ws0A-5vE3a5PrwAgRllhPRzPTaslGxwRbnrRB8J4tQSdM

    It is these sorts of calculations that make intermittent generation with storage appear viable. It does look at real time data but it does not look at the whole picture. Or, most importantly, the sustainability.

    Most of the hardware that goes into all the stuff to build the new energy system is made using low cost coal. The only way to assess the sustainability is to use the new energy to build the replacement hardware.

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      Graeme#4

      A quick first glance indicates some major problems:
      1. Costs are calculated using the faulty CSIRO GenCost report that only uses LCOE over 30 years. Therefore all the cost figures are immediately suspect.
      2. Seems to ignore the minimum energy output times and their durations. These are the critical issues.
      3. No figure for reliability quoted. When implementing any calculations, surely the starting point must be a reliability figure, i.e., what reliability you are trying to achieve.

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    David Maddison

    Biden’s dementia is causing him to say a lot of things his controllers have told him but he shouldn’t be repeating.

    https://redstate.com/nick-arama/2022/06/21/biden-lets-cat-out-of-the-bag-about-the-second-pandemic-n582169

    Biden Lets Cat out of the Bag About the ‘Second Pandemic’

    Joe Biden seems to be saying the quiet part out loud a lot lately, raising a lot of questions.

    He made a telling comment the other day about who is making up his mind when he was asked about China tariffs. He replied, “We are in the process of making up my mind.” He implied he was waiting for the go-ahead from someone else, saying he was “prepared to sign it and I’m ready to go.” That of course raised questions about who is controlling him and who’s making the decision there. Then when he was pressed on gas prices his response was this was good because “we have a chance here to make a fundamental turn toward renewable energy, electric vehicles, and not just luxury vehicles, but across the board.” So if you suffer, just remember it’s for the common good of Our Dear Leader’s climate goals.

    I don’t know what he’s on lately but he let more out of the bag today–and the way that he said it added to the creepiness of it all. When he was asked about the vaccines for children under age 5, he said he would be asking Congress for more money for that. But he said they also needed more money for something else.

    “We need more money to plan for the second pandemic. There’s going to be another pandemic,” Biden said. “We have to think ahead. And that’s not something the last outfit did very well. That’s something we’ve been doing fairly well. That’s why we need the money.”

    SEE LINK FOR REST

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    OldOzzie

    ‘Hypocrite’ politician is slammed for wasting precious electricity by leaving his office lights on 24/7- despite demanding ordinary Aussies and even hospitals reduce their usage to stop blackouts

    – Energy minister accused of wasting power by leaving lights on in electoral office
    – Matt Kean says lights are on 24-7 in his Hornsby office because of a wiring fault
    – Electrician offered to travel from northern beaches to fix light problem for free
    – Comes after Mr Kean urged everyone statewide to conserve power amid crisis

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    David Maddison

    From Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged:

    When you see that trading is done, not by consent, but by compulsion–when you see that in order to produce, you need to obtain permission from men who produce nothing–when you see that money is flowing to those who deal, not in goods, but in favors–when you see that men get richer by graft and by pull than by work, and your laws don’t protect you against them, but protect them against you–when you see corruption being rewarded and honesty becoming a self-sacrifice–you may know that your society is doomed.

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    OldOzzie

    Unvaccinated teachers who refused to get a Covid jab are finally allowed to return to work in Victoria – as the state battles a crippling staffing shortage

    – Unvaccinated teachers, school staff and childcare workers can resume work
    – Mandate which required those workers to be triple vaccinated will end on Friday
    – Parents won’t be able to ask for the vaccination status of school staff
    – Mandates scrapped in mainstream schools but will continue in specialist school

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      OldOzzie

      Feds Who Enforce COVID Shot Mandates Exempt Themselves From COVID Shot Mandates

      The Biden Administration’s COVID-19 shot mandates pushed out elite U.S. Navy SEALs, airline pilots, National Guard soldiers, Air Force pilots, cops, doctors, nurses, firefighters, and a host of other top-tier frontline professionals during the pandemic. After they destroyed the careers of thousands of these professionals, the mandates were confirmed to have been a fraudulent ruse.

      “It turns out if you don’t want to have to take a vaccine, just get a job enforcing the vaccine mandate,” says former Trump Administration chief of staff for the Department of Health and Human Services, Texas state representative Brian Harrison.

      Harrison says the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, charged with enforcing tyrannical shot and testing mandates, have exempted their own employees.

      You read that right.

      Harrison acquired a memo that reads in part, “CMS is rescinding and hereby removing the January 25, 2022 Memo regarding Vaccination Expectation for Surveyors Performing Oversight (QSO-22-10 ALL) from HHS’s guidance repository.”

      The memo says that, while there’s now no requirement for people to have a COVID shot to perform the CMS surveys, “we commend all the entities who have established COVID-19 vaccination programs for their surveyors and we continue to encourage vaccination of surveyors performing federal oversight surveys.”

      Harrison told Newsmax, “This shows that the Biden administration is truly authoritarian and these mandates never had anything to do with public health in the first place, but sadly and tragically, they had much more to do with giving the federal government more control over our lives. These mandates must end.”

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    crakar24

    Latest issue in their controlled demolition of the world economy is the USA to run out of diesel oil in about eight weeks

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    crakar24

    Lol it’s busted again I give up

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    OldOzzie

    ‘Morally bankrupt’: Biden ‘humiliated’ by Saudi Arabia and oil companies

    US President Joe Biden has been criticised as “morally bankrupt” and “weak” in regard to his energy policy after it was revealed he is planning to visit Saudi Arabia to discuss the global oil crisis.

    Reality trumps principles as Biden plans a meeting with the Saudi crown prince

    Biden’s first trip to the Middle East looks set to highlight the consistent inconsistency of his administration’s foreign policy

    All summed up in one Cartoon

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    John Connor II

    The Ukraine war and the forgotten victims – people’s pets

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=NW-D6O3QVo8

    The owners have fled but left their loved pets behind. Feel free to shed a tear or 10 😢

    If you want to send money to Ukraine then do it for the lonely abandoned starving pets rather than for Zelensky’s slush fund and weapons of war.

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    OldOzzie

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:
    June 23, 2022 at 2:15 pm

    ‘Experts’ have been so wrong on just about everything Adam Creighton

    It’s hard to recall a period in history in which experts have been so comprehensively wrong on so many topics in such a short time.

    Think Covid-19, Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and inflation.

    Intelligence experts looked foolish when it turned out Iraq didn’t have weapons of mass destruction after all.

    The Queen took a dim view of economists, who failed en masse to foresee problems in the world’s banking system that precipitated the global financial crisis in 2008.

    Economists have a long history of being wrong, at least since more than 300 of them publicly warned Margaret Thatcher in 1981 that the British prime minister’s belt-tightening policies would cause a recession, only to be proved spectacularly wrong a few months later.

    But the decade beginning in 2020 appears to have taken institutional wrongness to a higher plane. Economists, even after the embarrassment of calling inflation “transitory” for most of last year, are still at it; they wrote a public letter in September last year playing down concerns about inflation and encouraging Joe Biden to press ahead with his $US3.5 trillion Build Back Better package. But with inflation at almost 9 per cent in the US, supporters of the package have gone strangely quiet in recent months.

    Foreign policy experts, though, have given economists a run for their money since Russia invaded Ukraine, prompting the US and Europe to wallop Russia with unprecedented sanctions designed to compel Vladimir Putin to stop his illegal invasion.

    They fired a bazooka at their own feet, doing nothing to avert the war while crushing the competitiveness of European industry and slashing the living standards of ordinary Americans and Europeans. Goodbye German car industry, on current trends.

    It’s worse, though. In late March Biden, under the advice of experts no doubt, said Russia’s currency would be turned to “rubble” by sanctions. This week the rouble reached a seven-year high against the US dollar, becoming the best performing currency in the world this year.

    Interest rates on Russian 10-year government bonds, at about 9 per cent, are one percentage point lower than they were before the war. The Russian central bank is cutting interest rates as the Fed lifts them.

    Soaring energy prices, as a result mainly of Western sanctions, have supercharged Russian oil and gas revenues, quadrupling the Russian government’s budget surplus in May compared with the same month a year ago, as Putin gloated in St Petersburg last week.

    Security and intelligence experts haven’t done much better, routinely foreshadowing the collapse of Russian forces, or even the imminent death of Putin from a variety of diseases, all while those forces appear to have slowly occupied a fifth of Ukraine, including the crucial land corridor between Crimea and Russia.

    Perhaps these are the same US intelligence experts who in October 2020 publicly said they were convinced the files on Hunter Biden’s laptops, which have since raised serious questions about the business dealings of the US President’s family, had “all the classic earmarks of a Russian information operation”. Perhaps, but it was also entirely real, as similarly benighted media experts have now conceded.

    Then there’s the climate change and energy experts who have been telling us for years a rising share of solar and wind power in national grids would cause prices to decline, when the two nations furthest down that path – Germany and Denmark – have the most expensive power in Europe.

    Batteries would continue to get cheaper, the experts told us, seemingly oblivious of the impact an immense increase in mandated demand for electric cars and giant lithium batteries would have on the price of the critical minerals they require. Not very smart.

    But no group of experts can compete with epidemiologists and other so-called public health experts for being so militantly and repeatedly wrong about every aspect of their supposed speciality, which will go down as one of the great fiascos of history.

    Three weeks to flatten the curve turned into almost 850 days of chaotic, arbitrary restrictions that appeared to do very little in the end to stop the spread of Covid-19, let alone pass any sort of rational cost-benefit assessment.

    Cloth masks worked, then they didn’t; vaccines protected against infection, then they didn’t. Two doses were enough, then three, then four. The virus emerged zoonotically for certain, then it didn’t.

    “Experts say”, “experts warn” has become something of a joke. It’s not surprising that less than a fifth of American parents, for instance, intend to vaccinate their toddlers against Covid-19, according to a recent Kaiser Foundation survey, even though experts are recommending it urgently.

    This false narrative of a consensus among experts risks damaging public respect for all of them. That’s a pity because genuine expertise is valuable.

    The handful of people presented by the media as experts are a sliver of the total, among whom there is rarely a true consensus on anything. Social media has supercharged the incentives to moralise and fall victim to groupthink. On top of that, expert ranks have swollen as society has become richer, enabling more people to think for a living.

    That means the average quality of advice has declined, providing the media with a greater number of potentially crowd-pleasing, dubious opinions to promote. Experts get it wrong often because they bear few personal consequences of their advice. The accuracy of past predictions or assessments is rarely checked. For experts, it’s much more important to be on the right side of the debate than to be right. Most of all, experts’ incomes typically are guaranteed whatever they say; others bear the consequences.

    The past few years have been a crisis for the reputation of experts, but not for experts themselves.

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      Gerry

      It takes a few months reading reports and nothing else to be considered an expert …..it happened to me and it shook me up …. from then on I looked on experts with suspicion …they have to prove to my satisfaction that they are experts not by some status bestowed upon them ….

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    OldOzzie

    Editorial: Time for Biden to fire up the coal plants

    Opinion by Boston Herald editorial staff

    Joe Biden dropped the ball on U.S. energy security from Day One of his presidency, when he canceled the Keystone XL pipeline permit that would have brought as much as 900,000 barrels of crude oil into the U.S. system.

    He could not have anticipated the Russian invasion of Ukraine, but in banning U.S. imports of petroleum, coal and natural gas from Russia in response to it, he had to have at least had an inkling on its effect on gas prices here.

    Europe is in a full-blown energy crisis without oil imports from Russia, and several nations are taking the bull by the horns — they’re reverting to coal power.

    As Fox Business reported, “The cabinet has decided to immediately withdraw the restriction on production for coal-fired power stations from 2002 to 2024,” Dutch climate and energy minister Rob Jetten told reporters, adding that the decision had been made in preparation with other European countries.

    The government had been phasing out the use of coal to generate power by allowing coal-fired power stations to operate only to a maximum 35% of their capacity in recent years as it aims to transition to sustainable energy to cut greenhouse gas emissions.

    “The risk of doing nothing is too great,” Jetten said

    Austria, Germany, and Italy have all signaled that coal-fired power plants could provide a short-term solution given Europe’s heavy reliance on Russian energy.

    The U.S. policy toward coal plants is that they can’t shut down fast enough. They are cardinal sinners in environmentalists’ books. But right now, given the demand for power that’s coming down the pike with hot weather, a way to save natural gas supplies by a return to coal makes sense.

    This has the makings of a long, hot, expensive summer. Biden has the chance to do something practical to alleviate some of our energy problems.

    As Jetten said, the risk of doing nothing is too great.

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    David Maddison

    Mods, could you please check my comment #18, it seems to be stuck. Thanks.

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    John of Sunbury

    Pre-print paper analysing “serious adverse events of special interest” in Pfizer and Moderna phase III trial data (the data submitted to FDA for emergency use authorization).

    From Abstract …

    Results. Pfizer and Moderna mRNA COVID-19 vaccines were associated with an increased
    risk of serious adverse events of special interest, with an absolute risk increase of 10.1 and 15.1
    per 10,000 vaccinated over placebo baselines of 17.6 and 42.2 (95% CI -0.4 to 20.6 and -3.6 to
    33.8), respectively. Combined, the mRNA vaccines were associated with an absolute risk
    increase of serious adverse events of special interest of 12.5 per 10,000 (95% CI 2.1 to 22.9).
    The excess risk of serious adverse events of special interest surpassed the risk reduction for
    COVID-19 hospitalization relative to the placebo group in both Pfizer and Moderna trials
    (2.3
    and 6.4 per 10,000 participants, respectively).”

    https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=4125239

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    John Connor II

    Ability to balance on one leg linked to risk of death within 10 years

    Human balance is known to decline with age, and an international team of researchers has provided new evidence around whether this particular ability can serve as an indicator for risk of disease and death. The study involving more than 1,700 subjects found a disproportionate rate of death among those unable to complete a 10-second balance test, with the authors suggesting such an examination could become part of routine health checks from middle age onwards.

    https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2022/05/15/bjsports-2021-105360

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      yarpos

      Thank you for for the mental image of most of the forum members around the world balancing on one leg to see how they fared. I hope nobody broke anything.

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    David Maddison

    Has the “greenhouse effect” ever been proven on an open system like earth’s atmosphere?

    It seems not.

    It is claimed to exist simply because previous statements claimed it existed.

    It seems implausible that parts per million changes on minor trace gases such as CO2 can cause the dramatic changes attributed to it.

    Proof please.

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    John Connor II

    Adobe Acrobat may block antivirus tools from monitoring PDF files

    Security researchers found that Adobe Acrobat is trying to block security software from having visibility into the PDF files it opens, creating a security risk for the users.

    Adobe’s product is checking if components from 30 security products are loaded into its processes and likely blocks them, essentially denying them from monitoring for malicious activity.

    https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/adobe-acrobat-may-block-antivirus-tools-from-monitoring-pdf-files/

    I got hit with a pc virus many years ago that injected an unwanted URL into all PDFs on the primary partition. Around 2,000 files affected.
    I ended up doing a global search&replace changing the URL to a null string to fix it.

    So…it’d pay to check your system to see if this affects you and change the reg key if needed.
    Your AV needs to scan every file, with the exclusion of certain packed file types associated with some high-end software packages.
    Shame on Adobe..

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    el+gordo

    LIA fingerprint found in Tibet.

    ‘The collapse of a Tibetan kingdom in the 17th century may have been caused by falling temperatures, researchers have said.

    ‘The Guge kingdom was founded in western Tibet at the end of the 10th century and flourished for about 700 years before collapsing in the 1630s.

    ‘Its defeat by the neighbouring Ladakh kingdom ended its existence as an independent state, but then the population and society collapsed in the region.’ (SCMP)

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    John Connor II

    They Really Do Want You Eating Bugs: Cricket Production Subsidies From Ottawa

    Although it went unnoticed by many, Aspire did announce in 2020 that it would soon have the largest cricket processing plant in the world. The new plant in London, Ontario was completed in May 2022. Apparently, some 9,000 metric tons of crickets will be produced annually, both for human and animal consumption.

    https://lionessofjudah.substack.com/p/they-really-do-want-you-eating-bugs

    Enjoy your meat and bacon while you can…

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      Zane

      And from the mainstream media – crickets! 😃

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      David Maddison

      As I have warned many times, eating bugs is definitely on the Left’s agenda for non-Elites and there are more and more “special interest” stories to “normalise” it.

      Even the Australian motoring organisation, RACV, which no longer truly represents the motorist any more, had an article about it. Incidentally, the RACV is yet another example of a once-conservative organisation that has been infiltrated by the Left in accord with the plan of Rudi Dutschke’s “long march through the institutions”.

      https://www.racv.com.au/royalauto/sustainability/insect-food-and-bug-protein.html

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      yarpos

      Having seen the Vegetarian section still overflowing in the worst of the Covid panic buying, I find it hard to imagine there will be a great rush on the bug section.

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    John Connor II

    A Hybrid Flu-COVID Messenger RNA Jab Will Be Ready Within Months – Moderna Reveals Human Trials

    Despite the undeniable failure of the vaccine’s effectiveness, Burton described the experimental hybrid treatment as necessary, especially in the face of the new Omicron subvariants that are spreading across the west. He promoted Moderna’s latest iteration of the mRNA vaccine – the also-failed, Omicron-specific boosters – as the temporary solution until the new version is rolled out next year.

    https://lionessofjudah.substack.com/p/a-hybrid-flu-covid-messenger-rna

    I’m sure people will be queuing up for it 😉

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    John Connor II

    Lectins enhance SARS-CoV-2 infection and influence neutralizing antibodies

    SARS-CoV-2 infection-which involves both cell attachment and membrane fusion-relies on the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, which is paradoxically found at low levels in the respiratory tract1-3, suggesting that there may be additional mechanisms facilitating infection. Here we show that C-type lectin receptors, DC-SIGN, L-SIGN and the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin 1 (SIGLEC1) function as attachment receptors by enhancing ACE2-mediated infection and modulating the neutralizing activity of different classes of spike-specific antibodies. Antibodies to the amino-terminal domain or to the conserved site at the base of the receptor-binding domain, while poorly neutralizing infection of ACE2-overexpressing cells, effectively block lectin-facilitated infection. Conversely, antibodies to the receptor binding motif, while potently neutralizing infection of ACE2-overexpressing cells, poorly neutralize infection of cells expressing DC-SIGN or L-SIGN and trigger fusogenic rearrangement of the spike, promoting cell-to-cell fusion. Collectively, these findings identify a lectin-dependent pathway that enhances ACE2-dependent infection by SARS-CoV-2 and reveal distinct mechanisms of neutralization by different classes of spike-specific antibodies.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34464958/

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    John Connor II

    The ‘bubble raft’ solution can help the Earth cool down

    Architect Carlo Ratti’s Space Bubbles research project, along with other Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) researchers, proposes a “raft” of frozen bubbles at the Lagrange L1 point in the middle of the Earth. and the Sun. The bubbles are made from thin film materials and manufactured in space. When joined together, they will cover an area the size of Brazil (8.5 million square kilometers).

    Picture 1 of The ‘bubble raft’ solution can help the Earth cool down
    When combined, the bubbles will be as wide as Brazil.

    Space Bubbles is a variation on the idea of ​​​​cooling the Earth with a solar shield, which works by blocking some of the radiation from the star, thereby reducing the effects of global warming. The key difference, however, is that the solar shield in space poses no threat to Earth’s biosphere. Projects deployed in the Earth’s stratosphere come with this risk.

    https://www.dezeen.com/2022/06/13/mit-researchers-propose-space-bubbles-reflect-sun-design/

    Groan..whatever next..

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      Philip

      i actually fear geo engineering as a way of really disrupting the climate. People are mad enough to try something one day. James Lovelock wanted to make the sky grey in the 90’s, he said it was simple to do. Phillip Adams thought it a wonderful idea.

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    John Connor II

    Trust the pseudoscience

    https://truthbook.social/post/119619_trust-the-pseudoscience-hey-it-s-still-science-even-if-funded-by-pfizer-and-co.html

    What? Even with a mask on? 😉

    Sounds more like curtailing speech to me…

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    David Maddison

    Yesterday I went to the Hunter Valley and Burning Mountain, NSW, to see the world’s oldest coal seam fire, estimated to have been burning for at least 6000 years.

    On the way I saw both Liddell (2GW) and Bayswater (2.64GW) Power Stations, both targeted for closure under Australia’s de-electrification and de-industrialisation program.

    I try to visit power stations before they close them as a sort of tribute to former, more rational times.

    I think both the aforementioned power stations are fed coal by conveyor systems, but I also saw several extremely long coal trains, perhaps a kilometre long.

    In fact, according to the document you can Google “2021 HUNTER VALLEY CORRIDOR CAPACITY STRATEGY” the maximum coal train length on the rail network there can be 1,543m.

    Of course, most coal there is destined for export as Australians are not allowed to utilise this gift.

    Coal, wonderful coal!

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    David Maddison

    Gosh, what could it be?

    https://www.eviemagazine.com/post/sudden-adult-death-syndrome-thing-now-sounds-suspiciously-similar-sids

    Sudden Adult Death Syndrome Is A Thing Now, And It Sounds Suspiciously Similar To SIDS

    BY ALICIA BITTLE
    Jun 21st 2022

    So why is this important? Well, because contrary to what many sources will tell you, adults have been dying at alarmingly higher rates than usual lately.

    SEE LINK FOR REST

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    David Maddison

    I’m not sure if this is an additional windmill collapse, or the same as someone reported here about a week ago.

    https://esdnews.com.au/wind-turbine-collapses-at-alinta-wind-farm/

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    • #
      Ronin

      Looks like the tower failed due to metal fatigue, if you enter the lower level of one on a windy day and look up, you can see the column flexing, another reason why the gearbox bearings fail also.
      I was up at Crookwell windfarm last week and about one in 10 windmills were stopped and it was blowing 30 kts.

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      Graeme#4

      That’s the same one David. They shut down the entire wind farm to investigate.

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    Dennis

    Sky News – Credlin this evening – the Government of Germany has just announced that the plan to ban petrol and Diesel engine vehicles after 2035 has been overturned.

    This announcement follows the reopening of brown coal fired power stations in Germany as the wind turbine revolution economic damage reaches crisis point and at the same point in time the energy crisis is underway as Russia continues to attack the Ukraine.

    Climate hoax uncovered.

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    John Connor II

    Super gonorrhoea warning: Austrian man catches drug-resistant strain of STI from Cambodian prostitute as experts claim virus poses ‘major global threat’

    Super gonorrhoea poses a ‘major global threat’, scientists have warned in the wake of an Austrian man catching a drug-resistant version of the STI.

    The unidentified man, in his 50s, became infected after having unprotected sex with a prostitute while on holiday in Cambodia in April.

    Five days later, when he returned home, he experienced a burning pain while urinating and discharge from his penis.

    Medical tests reveled he had gonorrhoea and he was given standard antibiotics.

    While the drugs made his symptoms disappear, the man still tested positive — which meant the treatment had technically failed.

    Doctors called his strain ‘extensively drug resistant’ and different to ones seen before.

    They warned it could effectively render gonorrhoea untreatable, if it was allowed to spread.

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-10941755/Austrian-man-catches-Super-gonorrhoea-Cambodian-prostitute.html

    If you’re silly (or desperate) enough to hit up a pro you deserve what you get.
    One way or another human reproduction is collapsing…
    Will there be enough humans left to entertain the coming sentient AI’s?😁

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    R.B.

    Interesting spin by the ABC

    One study found that in 2021, the number of Australians drinking alcohol hit its highest level in five years and bottle shops were reaping the benefits.

    There was almost a 30 per cent increase in alcohol retail sales between 2019 and 2021 and along with it, jumps in alcohol-related ambulance callouts and alcohol-induced deaths.

    Alcohol Change Victoria’s Sarah Jackson said the alcohol industry exploited the pandemic as a marketing opportunity.

    So lockdowns did not cause deaths of people who had more years to live. It was the capitalist pigs who done it.

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    Zane

    The BBC has a story ” What if all roads were underground? ”

    The mind boggles at the cost.

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    Zane

    Elon Musk says his Tesla factories are currently losing billions of dollars.

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    Deano

    Sri Lanka is (supposedly) now broke and running out of basic supplies. Anyone else worried that ‘you-know-who’ will offer to help them in exchange for allowing military bases to be built?

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    David Maddison

    This is an excellent but sad video about the collapse of the American empire.

    https://youtu.be/GAstndvxGVM

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  • #

    In Europe, Valneve is now the 6th Corona vaccine approved, only for people from 18 to 50 years old people because of mssing date for elder people.

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    another ian

    More Starlink

    “Stockhead: SpaceX says Starlink could become ‘unusable’; archTIS wins $7m defence contract”

    https://api.starlink.com/public-files/12GHzInterferenceStudy_062022.pdf

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    another ian

    ” first a trickle, then a flood: the vaccine adverse events dam is breaking that which was recently unspeakable is fast becoming common conversation”

    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2022/06/23/oops-5/

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    OldOzzie

    For Northern Beaches Residents

    History Hub is your online source for Northern Beaches Library’s Local Studies collection. Here you can discover past and present stories of the Northern Beaches, its people and local environment.

    About the Collection

    Our physical resources and family history collection are available at our Local Studies Offices. You can search our physical collection using the Library’s catalogue.

    The Local Studies team is always keen to obtain historical material relevant to the Northern Beaches. Please contact us if you would like to donate.

    Explore
    Photographs 20,805
    Maps 757
    Oral Histories 199
    Factsheets 5,074
    People 542
    Council Engineers Reports 44
    Films 3
    Ephemera 119
    Publications 309
    Places 7
    Collections 23
    Objects 8
    Events 5
    Show All 28,093

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    OldOzzie

    Mak Siccar says:
    June 24, 2022 at 8:41 am
    From Westprint Maps. Oldies but goodies.

    Friday Funnies

    1. A priest, a doctor, and an engineer were waiting one morning for a particularly slow group of golfers.

    The engineer fumed, “What’s with those guys? We’ve been waiting for fifteen minutes!

    The doctor chimed in, “I don’t think I’ve ever seen such inept golf!

    The priest said, “Here comes the green-keeper. Let’s have a word with him.” He said, “Hello George, What’s wrong with that group ahead of us? They’re rather slow, aren’t they?

    The green-keeper replied, “Oh, yes. That’s a group of blind firemen. They lost their sight saving our clubhouse from a fire last year, so we always let them play for free anytime!

    The group fell silent for a moment.

    The priest said, “That’s so sad. I’ll say a special prayer for them tonight.

    The doctor said, “Good idea. I’ll contact my ophthalmologist colleague and see if here’s anything she can do for them.

    The engineer said, “Why can’t they play at night?

    2. The graduate with a science degree asks, “Why does it work?

    The graduate with an Engineering degree asks, “How does it work?

    The graduate with a Commerce degree asks, “How much will it cost?”

    The graduate with an arts degree asks, “Do you want fries with that?

    3. Two engineering students were riding bicycles across a university campus when one said, “Where did you get the great bike?”

    The second engineer replied, “Well, I was walking yesterday, minding my own business, when a beautiful woman rode up on this bike, threw it to the ground, took off all her clothes and said, “Take what you want.”

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    OldOzzie

    100-MAN brawl breaks out in front of terrified families… sparked by WATER PISTOL prank at Berlin outdoor pool

    – A huge brawl broke out in an outdoor swimming pool in Berlin over the weekend
    – The clash is said to have started after someone was sprayed with a water pistol
    – Around 100 police officers attended to break up the fight and arrested several

    From the Comments

    – not one German word was said in this video
    – Did you say Berlin or Baghdad?
    – They are definitely not German not a deck chair or towel in sight

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    OldOzzie

    Zulu Kilo Two Alpha says:
    June 23, 2022 at 6:17 pm
    From the Oz – I’ve posted the whole article.

    After Lisa Wilkinson’s remarks about Brittany Higgins, can Bruce Lehrmann ever receive a fair trial?CHRIS MERRITT

    15 minutes ago June 23, 2022

    By now, Lisa Wilkinson must understand the truly catastrophic consequences of her ill-advised remarks about Brittany Higgins.

    The real risk of a stretch in prison means she has no option but to surrender to Shane Drumgold, the ACT Director of Public Prosecutions, and provide every undertaking he has asked for – no matter how humiliating.

    If all Drumgold is after is a promise that she will mend her ways and respect the presumption of innocence, it will amount to one of the greatest exercises of prosecutorial restraint.

    This is the culmination of a regrettable period in which, to borrow a phrase from ACT Chief Justice Lucy McCallum, the boundary between allegations and proven facts has been obliterated by those who should know better.

    This affair is far from finalised. But when Drumgold sought his undertakings, both sides would have known that formal legal proceedings over Wilkinson’s remarks could have had a very different result.

    Those remarks cut across a pending jury trial by implicitly accepting the truth of allegations by Higgins.

    Seven years inside – or a fine of $112,000 – is the maximum penalty under the Criminal Code of the ACT for recklessly publishing material that could cause a miscarriage of justice in a legal proceeding.

    If that sounds harsh, consider the penalty for publishing material with the intention of causing a miscarriage of justice: ten years in prison or a fine of $160,000.

    This helps explain why Wilkinson was well advised to hire Dr Matt Collins QC, one of the nation’s leading media lawyers, soon after he told a television audience on Wednesday there was a “serious possibility” the authorities might consider laying charges over her remarks about Higgins.

    Based on what is already on the public record, and the adverse impact of her remarks on the trial of the man accused of [email protected] Higgins, a tougher approach by Drumgold would have presented Collins with the challenge of a lifetime.

    Proceedings under the Criminal Code could have come down to an argument over penalty: should Wilkinson go to prison – thereby ending her career – or merely be hit with a fine?

    This woman’s fate is a second-order issue. The real problem is whether Bruce Lehrmann, the man charged with [email protected] assaulting Higgins in Parliament House, can ever receive a fair trial.

    To ensure that happens, McCallum will need to overcome impediments that have been faced by few others.

    She delayed the trial, hoping that the passage of time would ease the prejudicial impact of Wilkinson’s remarks on potential jurors.

    Wilkinson, according to the Chief Justice, had “completely obliterated” the boundary between an allegation of [email protected] and a proven fact.

    What we are witnessing is not merely the fallout from one journalist’s brain snap. This is what happens when the presumption of innocence is discarded – not just by a handful of journalists, but by politicians who seem to believe this doctrine can be applied selectively.

    If Wilkinson is in trouble for making statements that implicitly endorse the truth of the Higgins allegation – and that is what McCallum asserted – what are we to make of the conduct of others in public life?

    In particular, what does this say about Scott Morrison’s apology to Higgins for “the terrible things that took place” in Parliament House?

    At least the former prime minister tried later to walk this back by saying it was “by no means a reflection on the matters before the court”.

    That was back in February, possibly too far back to influence a jury. But it was the same month in which the National Press Club provided a forum for Higgins and gave her a standing ovation. Was that another example of implicitly accepting the truth of her allegation?

    If not, why was she there sharing a platform with Grace Tame, whose accusations of [email protected] assault have been tested and upheld in a court of law?

    McCallum made the point on Tuesday there had been a “seamless elision” of the stories of the two women. They were not in the same category, the Chief Justice said.

    Nobody should ever forget that former attorney-general Christian Porter was hounded from office on the basis of an unprovable accusation, which he denied, of [email protected] misconduct as a teenager with a woman who is now deceased.

    It has subsequently emerged, in a book by Aaron Patrick, that one of those promoting that allegation had a youthful [email protected] relationship with Porter.

    McCallum is duty-bound to ensure that Lehrmann receives a fair trial. But the government of the ACT has limited her options.

    In May last year, before Lehrmann was committed for trial, this column warned that the intense publicity that had been given to the Higgins allegation made it essential for this case to be tried without a jury.

    It is now too late to change the law to give McCallum the option of running this trial without a jury, which has long been a fallback in NSW.

    Even now, a spokesman for ACT Attorney-General Shane Rattenbury says the territory is not considering judge-alone trials at this stage.

    “But we will see if there are any particular lessons to learn from this high-profile case,” the spokesman says.

    For Wilkinson, it looks like the worst she will face will be another grovel – which will be the third she has been required to make this month.

    She has already apologised for making light of the war in Ukraine and for accusing former MP Andrew Laming of taking an inappropriate photograph of a woman.

    For Lehrmann, justice now depends on jurors having poor memories.

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    robert rosicka

    Grid instability caused by wind farm testing last night in South Australia .

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-06-23/connection-issue-causes-lights-to-flicker-across-sa/101176004

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    OldOzzie

    Energy reality bites hard

    What we knew was coming

    Several years ago, I attended a Lunch & Learn by the CEO of the Clean Energy Council. He put up a slide listing all the Australian coal-fired power stations that would be reaching the end of their design life in the next thirty years. It looked something like this:

    He then put a question to the group: ‘Why wouldn’t we replace these with the cheapest form of energy available?’ It sounds obvious. At the time, a wind farm had been approved with an agreed price of only $55/MWh, which is a very low cost.

    The problem with this argument (as I previously pointed out here) is that you may be paying less for wind and solar, but you aren’t getting the same thing. Coal-fired power stations not only provide energy, they provide available capacity when the wind isn’t blowing, frequency stabilisation, and a single connection for a large energy supply.

    If we replace them with wind then we need wind farms, but we also need energy storage, frequency control systems, multiple connections – some of those with long transmission lines.

    I challenged the speaker with expensive reality after his presentation. He replied, ‘Yes, but nobody knows the cost of those things.’

    How is that an acceptable answer? If nobody knows the cost, you can’t just assume it is zero. That is beyond moronic, it is flagrantly dishonest.

    Here is a useful bit of information – the larger the portion of supply that comes from wind and solar, the more supplementary infrastructure is required.

    When renewables are supplying less than 20 per cent of total capacity, their shortcomings can be accommodated elsewhere in the electricity network. Above this, they begin to create significant issues.

    South Australia had to install a battery, synchronous condensers, additional backup generation, and relies heavily on its connection to the rest of the NEM through an interconnector. The Grattan Institute report Go for net zero showed that even achieving 90 per cent renewable would be significantly easier than 100 per cent.

    For this reason, after attending the IEA lunch, my conclusion was this: For now, we may be able to replace the coal generation we have lost with a combination of renewables, supplementary infrastructure, and other flexible backup generation (i.e. gas-fired open-circuit generators). So far we have indeed handled the closures of one-third of our coal plants, equivalent to about 20 per cent of energy supply.

    This is unlikely to continue.

    The sheer volume of energy that we will need to displace is large. The question is not whether the network can handle more renewables, but where they will even be installed and whether they can be built fast enough.

    Eventually, the storage problem will be revealed as just that – a problem. We may have to hold our noses and build more coal-fired generators. If we aren’t willing to do that then the only remaining compromise, as conservative commentators have been saying forever… may be to build some nuclear power plants.

    Yet the clear and loud objective of the clean energy council (which is a lobby) and many other parties, is to ensure this doesn’t happen. Their firm belief is that we can replace our fossil fuel generation with renewables. Worse, however, the attitude of many is that if they directly oppose coal-fired power, then they will force the change that they want.

    The Australian energy stalemate

    The future of our existing fossil-fuel assets has been topical for a long time. Back in 2017, it raised its head with the announcement of the closure of Liddell. You may recall that several conservative politicians (Tony Abbott, George Christensen, etc.) fought for Liddell to remain online and tabled nationalising it as a means to force its sale rather than closure. This was based on a kind of compromised view – if we are not going to build any new coal power, then at least we must try to get our current coal power to last as long as possible, to reduce the shock to the system.

    Some green idealists, however, responded with the opposite aim. They desire to close the coal plants as fast as possible to fulfil their primary goal – leaving coal in the ground. The most notable manifestation of this view is Mike Cannon-Brookes’ recent actions. Having earned billions from software development, he tried to team up with a Canadian investment company Brookefields to purchase AGL. The stated aim was to accelerate coal power-plant closures.

    AGL rejected his bid, and the board advanced a demerger proposal. The demerger would result in two companies, only one of which would hold all the coal generation assets. AGL has been responsible for building and managing a large number of renewables projects all around Australia, yet because they also own coal assets, they are demonised and considered untouchable for green investment. In response, Mike Cannon-Brookes bought 10 per cent of the company and sent a letter to the rest of the shareholders asking them to vote against the demerger. The board gave up the plan for the demerger, and several board members announced their impending resignations.

    AGL is in an unworkable position – no one wants to invest in their work. At the same time, as a major generator, they have obligations to the market operator. They are required to retain generation capacity or replace capacity that they remove, without compromising grid stability.

    Writers for The Guardian, RenewEconomy, many journalists at the ABC, and probably every Teal Independent, argue that the current crisis proves that coal is the problem. After all, the coal infrastructure is to blame, so we wouldn’t have these issues if it wasn’t there, right? But the current issue is being caused by only a partial supply shortfall of coal power. What if we lost it all?

    At the risk of repeating myself, I must stress: wind and solar can’t solve this problem. 100 per cent supply shortfalls of solar are a daily occurrence. It’s called nighttime. Supply shortfalls of wind are a weekly occurrence at least. The NEM was operating on only 1 per cent wind just two days ago. Comparing solar/wind supply with coal is to make a category error. One cannot replace the other until we have bulk energy storage infrastructure, which currently, simply, does not exist.

    Conclusion

    The current buzzword is ‘the energy transition’. Note the definite article ‘the’ – it is spoken about as if it is a fact, and yet it is not a transition driven by natural causes. Any natural drivers for change – such as scarcity or competitiveness of new technology – are many decades away. This is a transition that requires a forced change. Hence, the persistent focus of its proponents on government action and divestment.

    Yet this is our power supply that they are messing with. When there are supply shortfalls in the electricity market, people die. And they don’t die in twenty years due to global temperature rises, they die tomorrow. Unlike the ‘climate emergency’, electricity supply shortfalls actually meet the definition of an emergency.

    If Australian billionaires and investors wish to effect an energy transition, then they are free to build the technology needed to do it. They can build batteries and develop tidal technology, geothermal, or solar, they can support better housing insulation, they can make hydrogen or ammonia or biogas, they can make electric vehicles… They can do whatever floats their boats. But until they have, they need to stop demonising and sabotaging the infrastructure that already exists and is keeping us alive.

    That’s the reality, and reality always wins.

    Excellent Spectator Australia Article – more detail in link

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          OldOzzie

          Wind farm’s connection to power grid causes lights to flicker across South Australia

          A connection between Port Augusta Renewable Energy Park and the national electricity grid is under investigation for causing lights to flicker and dim across South Australia for hours this morning.

          Energy distributor ElectraNet said the privately-owned power generator connected its new wind farm to the grid in South Australia’s north about 1:30am, causing a “voltage issue”.

          There have been widespread reports of house and street lights flickering across the state as a result.

          The minister stopped short of assigning blame but said it could be “a connection issue”.

          “We don’t know what the actual cause is. We know the source of the problem but we don’t know who was causing it,” he said.

          “It could have been [the] renewable energy park, it could have been ElectraNet.”

          ElectraNet said it worked with the Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) to identify the cause and the third party was disconnected from the network.

          It said power supplies returned to normal about 5:30am.

          ElectraNet interim chief executive Rainer Korte said the fluctuations had less of an impact than they otherwise would have because the wind farm generator concerned was only in the commissioning phase.

          “We don’t like to see these impacts, but the reason we take a cautious approach to commissioning the gradual release of capacity is exactly for this reason — to identify any issues and limit the impact of any issues that may be identified,” he said.

          Mr Koutsantonis said large operators such as GFG and BHP noticed the “voltage fluctuations”.

          He denies there was an inherent problem with renewable energy.

          “I don’t think it was anything malicious or dangerous. I just think it’s probably testing, probably either a new generator that’s attempting to establish its connection to the grid after commission,” he told ABC Radio Adelaide this morning.

          “There was testing and as demand started to increase into the day, they pulled the testing and the flickering stopped.”

          Premier Peter Malinauskas said ElectraNet controlled the transmission lines from power stations to localised networks.

          “The transmission lines issue sits with ElectraNet and apparently there’s a frequency issue there with one of their feeders,” he said.

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    OldOzzie

    Your new Bidentalk transliteration challenge – only 8 secs

    https://mobile.twitter.com/JamesMelville/status/1539581635154350081

    go!

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      OldOzzie

      UNBELIEVABLE! Look At This Piece Of Paper Biden Is Holding With Instructions Reminding Him To Do The Most Basic Things

      As Joe Biden met with wind industry executives at the White House on Thursday, the gaffe-prone illegitimate commander-in-chief mistakenly held a cheat sheet backwards.

      The card showcased to the world step-by-step guidance prepared by his staff instructing him to the illegitimate president to do the most basic things.

      “YOU enter the Roosevelt room and say hello to participants,” the notecard states.

      The staff wrote the words “you” and “your” in capitalized letters to emphasize to the leader of the free world, who regularly forgets where he is, who he is talking to, what he is talking about and who he is, the appropriate time to sit or speak.

      “YOU take YOUR seat,” advised the card, titled, “Offshore Wind Drop-By Sequence of Events.”

      “YOU give brief comments,” the instructions continued.

      The card also instructed Biden which reporter to take a question from.

      “YOU ask Liz Shuler, President, AFL-CIO, a question,” the staff wrote. “YOU Thank participants.”

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    another ian

    “A pound of grasshoppers is three times as nutritious as a pound of beef”

    https://ifunny.co/picture/you-vill-eet-ze-bugz-steve-keating-a-pound-of-jjZYpgHe9

    So there is a thriving industry praying for locust plagues that never caused famines?

    I’d have to wonder how that was decided – IIRC

    Crude Protein = % Nitrogen * 6.25

    Digestible Protein not so much

    An example – mulga leaves (phyllodes) can run 10 – 12% crude protein which sounds OK nutritionally

    BUT, due to tannin content, digestible protein is less than half that and not OK nutritionally

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      another ian

      More wondering on that –

      Seems there would be a lot of chitin in that which would add to the N content

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chitin

      but which might lack in terms of human nutrition

      ” It is functionally comparable to the protein keratin. ”

      Our pup considers it one of her treats to clean up fingernail clippings – but I doubt she gets much nutrition that way

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        another ian

        Back in the days of the Rocky Mountain locust plagues

        ” Charles Valentine Riley, a Missouri entomologist, came up with a recipe for locusts seasoned with salt and pepper and pan-fried in butter. The recipe sold, but some stated that they “would just as soon starve as eat those horrible creatures” ”

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocky_Mountain_locust

        But a recipe is not actual nutritional information

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    OldOzzie

    Top Ender says:
    June 24, 2022 at 5:05 am
    Adam Bandt unfurls banner of a radical culture war

    JOHN CARROLL

    Adam Bandt’s refusal to stand next to the national flag has provoked a wide and heated reaction, unsurprisingly.

    The flag carries a lot of symbolic freight. It has waved overhead since Federation in 1901, watching over the nation’s history in its entirety. It has hung there throughout the ups and downs of the 20th century, and beyond, as a sentinel of national unity. Soldiers have died under it. Olympic medallists have stood proudly, often with tears in their eyes, as it has slowly been raised aloft to acknowledge their triumphs. It overlooks the national anthem to open football grand finals – in effect, giving official recognition to the event. It has been waved during royal visits. It emblazons Parliament House in Canberra.

    In effect, the flag raises the hand of secular benediction over the nation, blessing it. It stands with the Constitution and the vast assembly of public institutions as the bedrock of society.

    The Bandt Luther moment – “Here I stand, I can do no other!” – signals that he regards Australia as illegitimate. He will agree to speak in public flanked by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island flags, but not in the company of the national flag. For, as he puts it, it celebrates racist division.

    If he truly believed in his own act, he should quit parliament. To remain is hypocritical. Parliament stands at the apex of institutions that make up the fabric of the nation. It stands equally as a condensation of the traditions, customs, and habits of civic life, with sources going back to first British settlement, and back behind that to the accumulation of legal and democratic wisdom developed across centuries in England. To cancel the flag is, at the symbolic level, to cancel federal parliament.

    Our flag as it is, invested with the entire substance of the nation’s history and memory, signals cohesion and togetherness. So, is the word treason too extreme in referring to a member of parliament who would tear it down?

    The Bandt moment might be passed off as just another example of the blindness to reality that pervades Greens politics. The party can mouth an absurd energy policy of no coal and no nuclear – which means, at this point, no base­load supply, in effect no electricity – because it will never form government. The shunning of the flag is different. The radical view of Australia being a cruel, mean, divisive and racist society, a view that has been percolating through schools and universities, is being taken into the political mainstream.

    Bandt may come to regret making so open and honest the ultimate goal of much radical politics. This week he wore his political heart on his sleeve. Hatred of nation will not go down well in the mainstream electorate. At the election last month the teals were successful at keeping the extent of their own radicalism undercover. Next time they may suffer from the naive frankness of the Greens’ leader.

    John Carroll is professor emeritus of sociology at La Trobe University.

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    OldOzzie

    German Economic Minister Announces Restart of Coal Power Plants for Electricity Due to NATO Sanctions and German Dependence on Russian Oil and Gas

    To say the recent remarks from German Economic and Climate Minister Robert Habeck showcase the stupidity of the western sanctions would be an understatement. In a broad energy policy announcement to the German people, Minister Habeck has announced that natural gas is now urgently being stored and built up in order to survive next winter.

    Additionally, the German parliament is being called into emergency session to re-write climate laws allowing coal-fired electricity power plants to be brought back on-line. Essentially, years of German renewable energy investments and initiatives are now being reversed in order to maintain the commitment to NATO sanctions against Russia.

    In order to unbuckle themselves from dependence on Russian pipelines, Habeck also announced that floating Liquified Natural Gas terminals will have to be created so they can source LNG from other nations. Currently Germany has no port system to offload LNG, they will be purchasing and leasing floating ships to act as LNG terminals.

    I am reminded of the prior warning to Germany from U.S. President Donald Trump. It’s worth remembering that U.S. media blasted President Trump for being so brutally honest in his NATO remarks where he warned about the danger of Germany being so dependent on Russia for oil and gas. WATCH: 2 mins 6 secs

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    CHRIS

    Bandt should be charged with treason

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