JoNova

A science presenter, writer, speaker & former TV host; author of The Skeptic's Handbook (over 200,000 copies distributed & available in 15 languages).


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Thursday Open Thread

8.6 out of 10 based on 12 ratings

248 comments to Thursday Open Thread

  • #
    OldOzzie

    IS AMERICA IN IRREVERSIBLE DECLINE?

    New Criterion editor and publisher Roger Kimball posed the question to “Visiting Critic” Conrad Black. Roger introduces Black and Black provides the answer to the question Roger posed in the New Criterion’s third annual Circle Lecture, posted online here and embedded below. Black discusses his lecture and other topics with New Criterion executive editor James Panero in an interview that is also posted at the link.

    It is an understatement to say that Black brings the perspective of history to the answer he frames in his lecture. It is learned. It is literate. It is thought-provoking. It is eloquent in the high style. It speaks with understandable bitterness about our criminal justice system. It puts in a good word for the the tax that incited the Boston Tea Party. By my lights it is funny in its own deadpan way. It may even be right. I found it well worth my time.

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      Philip

      The whole of western civilization is in decline, and has been for quite some time.

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      Sceptical+Sam

      Thank you OldOzzie for referencing that Analysis by Conrad Black.

      He is right to be optimistic. Biden’s incompetence will lead to a much stronger America sooner than most imagine.

      The last couple of minutes is well worth the wait.

      20

  • #
    OldOzzie

    Coming Into Focus: Hillary’s Secretive, Russiagate-Flogging Pair of Super-Lawyers

    Here are the prime movers of the false Trump-Russia theory that roiled U.S. politics for years: Clinton lawyers Michael Sussmann, left, and Marc Elias. Some of Sussmann’s role emerges in his recent indictment for lying to the FBI — but more consequential acts are outlined below. And Elias’s role in the Steele dossier was hidden through lies, “with sanctimony, for a year,” as one journalist put it.

    By Aaron Maté, RealClearInvestigations
    October 19, 2021

    The indictment of Hillary Clinton lawyer Michael Sussmann for allegedly lying to the FBI sheds new light on the pivotal role of Democratic operatives in the Russiagate affair. The emerging picture shows Sussmann and his Perkins Coie colleague Marc Elias, the chief counsel for Clinton’s 2016 campaign, proceeding on parallel, coordinated tracks to solicit and spread disinformation tying Donald Trump to the Kremlin.

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    • #
      Forrest Gardener

      The FBI are now claiming that they were unwilling dupes. Did I get that right?

      My crystal ball says that they have picked out a couple of fall guys who don’t mind the notoriety or going quiet for a year or so as long as they get the book deals and the appearance fees along the way. And then they can go back to their lucrative positions doing what they do best.

      We’ll know the FBI is serious when FBI types go to jail. Until then it is all kabuki theatre.

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  • #
    TdeF

    On Breitbart
    The Emperor Has No Clothes
    58% Say Biden Not Mentally or Physically Capable of Being President
    Only 38% Believe Joe Actually in Charge!

    Only a senile person who happens to be Commander in Chief of the military could demand and effect the instant removal of all military forces from Afghanistan. It was against all sense, all military doctrine, hugely dangerous and costly in every way. Whoever was in charge of this geriatric then organized to send 3,000 of them back, but too late.

    So while China thought Biden would be hapless and they are right, other people are now in charge and they have no idea who. Nor does the American public. It is a very dangerous and much more unpredictable situation than the planners of the imminent Taiwan invasion could have predicted.

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    • #

      I do like an article about a poll that does not examine the polling method at all.

      So… Biden removed forces from Afghanistan. Let me think. Was it Biden who put that policy in place?

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      • #
        TdeF

        Policy? The Military do not work on policy. They respond to orders. The instant and total withdrawal of all military forces was a direct order from the Commander in Chief. No one else has the authority to issue such an incredible order. And without telling their many allies who also had forces and civilians there in support of the US mission. And in the US 2.2 million people serve in the military each year, everyone knows it. Zero respect has been achieved with tens of millions of Americans. The man in charge of the most powerful military arsenal in the world has proven to be dangerously unpredictable.

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          Tel

          The US military hardly respond to orders from the top, as the chubby cheek baby face Lt Col Alexander Vindman explained under oath … if he doesn’t like the President’s foreign policy he will do something else.

          Under Trump they slow-walked everything, refused to leave Syria and kept delaying the exit from Afghanistan. Under Biden they figured they could keep up the shenanigans but Biden put his foot down and ordered them out … at which point they went into a tailspin at the last possible minute and then made a deliberate mess of it.

          It was pure brinkmanship, they were determined to bluff the President and stay regardless, then when that didn’t work they resorted to malicious compliance. If Biden was a stronger, sharper President most of the military brass would be relaxing in the brig by now.

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      • #
        John+R+Smith

        So, you’re saying Trump made him do it?
        Trump turned me into a newt.

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        • #

          It was Trump’s order (thanks TdeF). Are you saying that Trump would not have followed through?

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          • #
            clarence.t

            Wrong. Trump instigated a phased, controlled withdrawal.

            Biden was clueless how to implement it, and stuffed up monu-mentally

            I can’t believe any rational person would ever try to support Biden’s ineptitude. !

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          • #
            TdeF

            I did not say that. You are projecting nonsense. But some people have real reading and comprehension difficulties.
            And you have missed the whole difference between a strategic, staged withdrawal in any conflict and a total unplanned rout without even telling your friends.

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            TedM

            Trump had a well planned withdrawal strategy, easy to find online if you incentive. Biden’s handlers who are actually in control, clearly planned for a withdrawal that would further weaken the United States.

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      • #
        William

        The Trump withdrawal deal was loaded with caveats, all of which the Biden administration ignored in their haste to withdraw troops.

        350

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          TdeF

          No military man would do what was done without direct orders. It was utterly wrong, stupidly wrong, morally wrong, strategically wrong. One decision betrayed everyone and destroyed everything achieved in 20 years of great loss for many countries. And betrayed loyal allies who had supported the mission for 20 years and cost many lives. For what?

          All Presidents have this authority since General George Washington, but to give it to a senile lifelong public servant of no consequence betrays all those who gave their lives since Congress approved the War on Terror. Total Capitulation. Overnight.

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            TdeF

            And what of the 41 Australians who died there? Plus many badly maimed with loss of limbs and more? For what? Whatever sock puppet Biden is thinking, he has proven seriously dangerous and unpredictable. On the positive side, this has likely worried President Xi more than anyone expected because clearly President Biden acts impulsively without taking advice from the military.

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          PeterS

          That’s being too polite. I would suggest that the Democrats sabotaged the whole plan to put the blame on Trump. The trouble is it backfired because the result was far worse than they expected.

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        • #
          Mark Kaiser

          Agreed William

          My favorite Trump caveat was from this interview where Trump describes his talk with Abdul Ghani Baradar. Quote is from 8:00 minute mark.

          and if you do anything out of the normal, but anything bad to America or any American citizens, I will hit you harder than anybody has ever been hit in world history. You will be hit harder than any country and any person has ever been hit in world history. And we will start with the exact location and the exact town, and it’s right here.”

          https://hughhewitt.com/former-president-donald-j-trump-on-the-debacle-in-afghanistan/

          Somehow I think the Afgan pullout would have gone smoother with Trump as president.

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      • #
        yarpos

        Spoken like a true creature of the swamp that cant (or does want to) differentiate between policy and execution.

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    • #
      Doc

      Looking at the entire debacle of the USA under the Biden Presidency, it is a performance that wouldn’t have Occasio Cortez too far from the centre of power behind Biden. It is a move to the extreme left of huge proportions.

      The voters don’t have any rights to grumble – if they aren’t really as far left in their thinking as their voting is said to have been to get the election results they did – because the current mess, whether by design or not, was all openly on display re the future under the Democrats in the run-up to those elections. The US is reaping the whirlwind that it chose as being better than having a personality like Trump as their President regardless of how well he did in recovering the nation in most areas.

      Unfortunately, Australia is odd nation out amongst the Western Democracies. Boris has gone a green shade of woke, and the EU is so entwined with China economically that it is green, woke and impotent against China’s aggression. ‘Biden’ is green and woke, with a horrid rumour against him re China and is totally unable to solve the US problems, even if he wanted to. He’s also joined with the EU and China in threatening our trade if we don’t do as we are told on the Climate. Both China and our ‘friends’ want us to be their obedient lapdog. A mat to stand on. That’s the problem Morrison has to solve for us and I don’t envy his task at all, Whatever he decides he will be open to a huge media mauling and from all sides.

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  • #
    OldOzzie

    China Warming

    The CCP is by far the biggest contributor to climate change on the planet. Is that a problem?

    Many of the world’s leaders appear to believe that emissions of carbon dioxide (CO₂) constitute an existential threat whose impact is already severe and will become impossible to deal with within a very few years. This has resulted in a number of international agreements, beginning with the Rio Pact of 1992 and continuing up through the 2016 Paris Accords. Despite these agreements, the increase in the concentration of CO₂ in the atmosphere continues unabated (see Figure 1). In surveying the underlying science, it becomes clear that the role played by China in this story is indicative of a more general cynicism inherent in many of the supposed “solutions” to climate change.

    One sees frequent references to the agreement of 97% of the world’s scientists. However, as pointed out by Joseph Bast and Roy Spencer (and myself), this claim is specious. One also sees references to increases in things like sea level, hurricanes, and other weather extremes, but as been widely noted, these claims are based on the illegitimate cherry picking of starting dates for the trends. There is also the important question of what exactly constitutes an existential threat.

    From a minimum in temperature around 1960 (basically the end of a modest cooling trend beginning around 1939, which led to concerns over global cooling) until 1998, the global mean temperature anomaly (the index used to describe the Earth’s temperature) did increase by about 0.5 degrees Celsius. That’s a small change compared to the typical change between breakfast and lunch, though the net increase since then has been relatively insignificant (except for a major El Niño in 2014-16) and appreciably less than predicted by all climate models. It should be noted that the increase was small compared to what was happening in any given region, and temperatures at any given location were almost as likely to be cooling as warming. Despite the fact that increases of CO₂ thus far have been accompanied by the greatest increase in human welfare in history, and despite the fact that there have been large increases in the Earth’s vegetated area largely due to increases in CO₂’s role in photosynthesis, governments seem to have concluded that another 0.5 C will spell doom.

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    • #
      TdeF

      While Rio Tinto in Australia considers that Aluminum smelting is basically impossible without generating CO2, it leaves China as the world’s only hope for metals. Smelting of all metals removes Oxygen with Carbon, producing CO2. The same with so many processes such as producing concrete, fertilizer, miracle hydrogen from fossil fuel and even carbon dioxide itself. So we all have to declare our total dependence on China. So who is driving this? It hardly is a question which needs to be asked. Cui Bono.

      With Hydrogen it is proposed that windmill/solar produce electricity to get hydrogen from water to use for smelting, obseleting every smelter in the world and making all but Chinese metals unaffordable, as with rare earth metals today which have gone from $10 a kg to $250 a kg. All to avoid producing CO2, the greatest threat to world peace for Democratic countries. It isn’t.

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      • #
        MP

        A good paper on the process.

        In recent years, car-bon dioxide emissions have become a central issue for the industry. Carbon dioxide gas is formed at the anode, as the carbon anode is consumed upon reaction of carbon with the oxygen ions from the alumina (Al2O3). Formation of carbon dioxide is unavoidable as long as carbon anodes are used, and it is of great concern because CO2 is a greenhouse gas. Over the last two decades, concerted action has been taken by the aluminum industry to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, both from the anodes and from energy sources used to generate the electricity required for production. Some aluminum pro-ducers are actively engaged in research and development work to try Copyright © 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. May 2014to minimize or even eliminate the carbon dioxide emissions from the process
        https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262148553_The_Aluminum_Smelting_Process

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      • #
        RickWill

        With Hydrogen it is proposed that windmill/solar produce electricity to get hydrogen from water

        This is not what is being proposed. It is not economic to build any process plant that only runs on intermittent generation. The three funded projects will source power from existing reliable source such as the grid. And I can tell you for certain that Australia is a long way from having a grid powered from intermittent sources.

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        • #
          TdeF

          Yes, but that completely invalidates the idea of CO2 free power generation. And without that, there is no point in producing hydrogen in the first place. It just pushes the problem upstream, like electric cars which generate more CO2 overall if powered by coal. Which they are.

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      • #
        beowulf

        The proverbial is about to hit the fan world-wide.

        All the power and production problems in China are about to have a massive knock-on effect in the rest of the world, leading to massive industrial shutdowns because China has been allowed to gain a virtual monopoly on the raw materials of production.

        China, which is Europe’s and America’s main magnesium supplier, has ordered roughly 35 of its 50 magnesium smelters to close until the end of the year to conserve power supplies.

        “In the last several weeks, magnesium availability has dried up and we have not been able to purchase our required Mg units for all of 2022,” Matalco (a major US supplier) said.

        Alcoa Corp., the largest U.S. maker of raw aluminum, also voiced concerns about magnesium scarcity and has been seeing so-called force majeure declarations by some suppliers.

        Matalco and Alcoa both noted that silicon also is in short supply. That shortage, sparked by production cuts in China, sent prices up 300% in less than two months. Aluminum billets can’t be produced without magnesium and silicon, which are essential hardeners for alloys.

        In Europe it’s the same.

        It is expected that the current magnesium inventories in Germany and respectively in the whole of Europe will be exhausted by the end of November 2021.”

        In just the auto industry magnesium-aluminium alloys are used in engine blocks, gearboxes and steering columns, seat frames and fuel tanks, some outer panels and other components.

        “Thirty-five per cent of downstream demand for magnesium is auto sheet — so if magnesium supply stops, the entire auto industry will potentially be forced to stop.”

        Also threatened is the entire aluminium value-addition chain in sectors such as the aircraft, construction, packaging and engineering.

        https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-10-14/aluminum-makers-sound-the-alarm-about-u-s-magnesium-shortage

        https://www.mining.com/global-shortage-of-magnesium-to-cripple-car-industry/

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    • #
      clarence.t

      “The CCP is by far the biggest contributor to climate change on the planet.”

      ? Really ? What a monumentally dumb statement.

      In what way does China contribute to “climate change™”?

      Not by CO2 release, because CO2 doesn’t affect climate.

      140

  • #
    Don B

    Sorry about this repeat, but the Nebraska Attorney General gave an opinion last week saying it was OK for doctors to prescribe Ivermectin and Hydroxycloroquine for the prevention and treatment of Covid-19.

    I would never have thought a legal opinion could be so knowledgeable about this important medical subject.

    https://ago.nebraska.gov/sites/ago.nebraska.gov/files/docs/opinions/21-017_0.pdf

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    • #
      OldOzzie

      Is Aspirin the New Horse Dewormer?

      Aspirin is one of those drugs that has been around forever. It is commonly used as a pain reliever, anti-inflammatory, and blood thinner. Surprisingly it may also have benefits in treating COVID.

      A paper in Anesthesia and Analgesia published last spring titled, “Aspirin use is associated with decreased mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit admission, and in-hospital mortality in hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019.”

      This was a retrospective, observational study of adult patients admitted to multiple hospitals in the U.S. between March and July 2020, in the early days of COVID. The primary outcome addressed by the researchers from George Washington University was the need for mechanical ventilation, which then, and still now, carries an extremely high chance of never leaving the ICU alive.

      This was not a gold standard randomized prospective clinical trial. That would not be feasible in this situation since study patients were already hospitalized and critically ill.

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      • #
        TdeF

        No surprise as it is also a no brainer in preventing clotting, which is the fundamental way in which Wuhan flu kills.

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        • #
          Hanrahan

          My reading says that clotting is the way the vax kills, but I am not skilled enough to say you are wrong.

          00

    • #
      OldOzzie

      Why is the medical profession letting us die?

      Thank you, Dr. Brian C. Joondeph, for your article on aspirin as a potential part of the COVID treatment regimen. And for mentioning ivermectin and hydroxychloroquine as similar safe and potentially effective therapeutics.

      Here are a couple more to be considered. (Please note that I am not a physician, and I am not dispensing medical advice. I’m just commenting on publicly available information.) Bromhexine, an ingredient found in some cough suppressants, may work due to its protease-inhibitor functions, according to a paper released in May 2020. It appears to have use as both a prophylactic and a treatment.

      A number of antihistamines, including diphenhydramine, sold under label as Benadryl and found in many other OTC formulations, seem to be effective against SARS-CoV2. This information was released in January 2021.

      So many observational data have come out since the beginning of this pandemic. So many potential therapeutic and preventative treatments, yet so little interest on the part of medical boards and policymakers. What’s going on here?

      It’s my belief, reluctantly arrived at over more than a year, that medical and political policymakers do not have our best interest at heart. They want the power, the glory, and the pats on their narcissistic little heads. They want to be mommy, and daddy, and nursie, and the only adults in the entire country capable of making medical decisions for the rest of us.

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      • #

        (My bolding here)

        They want to be mommy, and daddy, and nursie, and the only adults in the entire country capable of making medical decisions for the rest of us.

        Have you noticed how every time Palaszczuk gets in front of a camera, she spruiks exactly what was highlighted above, and believe me, if you live in Queensland, it’s all you get for the first 15 minutes of the news every night, and hourly news bulletins on the radio, every channel, with Palaszczuk seeking out the cameras with radar like efficiency. It’s like she spends the early part of the day with ‘marketing’ for the latest ‘meme for the day, (‘lifeboat’ yesterday) and then banging on about it ad infinitum.

        It’s always about ‘her’ being the only one who can save Queenslanders, as shown in yesterday’s quote, in the article at this link. (again, my bolding here)

        Ms Palaszczuk said yesterday told Queenslanders she cannot look after them if they do not get on the “life boat” and get jabbed”.

        All day every day.

        Tony.

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        • #
          Ronin

          Yes, the panic is really on now, get in the lifeboat, we can’t save you unless you get in the lifeboat. LOL

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        • #
          Grogery

          Yeah, coercing everybody (without exception) into the lifeboat while so many healthy able bodied seamen (and other genders) would be perfectly ok staying in the ship.

          130

        • #
          TdeF

          Enough to give you the ships. But you would have to experience Daniel Andrews to get real frustration. And it’s all your fault, not his.

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        • #
          STJOHNOFGRAFTON

          Ms Palaszczuk said yesterday told Queenslanders she cannot look after them if they do not get on the “life boat” and get jabbed”.
          Clear evidence of Palaszczuk’s Messiah Complex? Another False Messiah yet?

          50

      • #
        C.+Paul+Barreira

        I read this article some days ago and found some of the information interesting. The final paragraph which you quote, OldOzzie, seems underwhelming. Perhaps it holds for some but more broadly I doubt it. The TGA, for instance, is largely anonymous. Those in medicine who find their (specious) reasoning compelling appear concerned for maintaining a monolithic appearance of authority. Careers matter. Ideology informs many opinions.

        What I find remarkable in Australia after some twenty months of experience with this virus, is the intellectual stagnation. South Australia, to name but one, has gone simply nowhere in that time. Yet these people are more than handsomely remunerated. Their reasoning—to the extent that such a term applies—is untouchable and protected by a totally incurious media and, apparently, Parliament. Best characterised as negligent, the intellectual circumstances are quite alarming.

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      • #
        Doc

        I would suggest most practicing doctors are doing no more than the very hard job of looking after their patients during these times. Coughs colds and COVID don’t excite most practitioners; they are too busy contending with their full waiting rooms doing their best not to miss the very sick and rapidly prescribing for the huge numbers of not so sick. They don’t make the rules on therapies; they follow the guidelines given them, get a few hours sleep and roll up for the same next day. At one stage they were being threatened with gaol if they dared follow what they read overseas on therapies. The same sort of day happens in ICU’s around the country. All the medical people treating
        people are frontline themselves. They are very unlikely to wish to be ‘momma and poppa’ when they are more at risk themselves, by exposure, than are their patient and the public in general.

        I believe there is a contractual block with the drug companies that prevent the use of observed effective therapies from overseas. It is also interesting that even now there doesn’t seem to be papers released with full investigation of those therapies. If there were the press would surely be full of therapeutic news and doctors on the front line would be given carte blanche to extend the prescribing. It smells of a block in the system, possibly on the basis of overselling ‘essential vaccines’ as a panacea that only have very limited lifespans of cover. It would seem to me that if we are ever to get on top of COVID-19 we have to have cheap, effective antivirals to do so.

        By the time Australia and Australian States open up, a huge number of our double jabbed, those first vaccinated, will have little effective cover remaining. As a person who had cardiac complications from each of two doses, I am not looking favourably at a third, fourth or fifth dose. I don’t envy WA, Qld and SA when we have to open up. It may be that the longer we wait the worse it will be. We wont have a reasonable number of people with more effective natural immunity to blunt the viral bullets. Is this the quandry that even Victoria has faced up to and is taking the current virus battering to build up natural immunity resistance in as many as possible while the protection from severe illness with the vaccines last.

        Today on Fox, a doctor talked statistics saying ‘take away COVID related deaths and there is still left an excessive number of deaths from other causes’. He didn’t wish to be too specific yet but…… watch this space.

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          OldOzzie

          Doc you did not go with an antiviral approach?

          Walking through the doors of Hospital 2 times every 3 weeks, for over a year with 4 minor ops in that time, (last 3 weeks 7 times), having been on antiviral approach for over year, besides being the only one in blended 3 generation family of 4 adults and 3 grandkids who has not been ill over the last 3 years, one would think a Hospital could be a dangerous place

          My specialists are amazed at how healthy I am and I keep bouncing along.

          I have had the Seniors Flu jab for 11 years and will probably go with Novavax Vaccine as it is a protein subunit vaccine, similar to the Pneumococcal Vaccines I have had.

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          • #
            Doc

            Been retired for a while OldOzzie. Not doing badly for age, but knocked around by the Astra. I think most doctors would have gone for therapeutics due to the reporting from overseas that was coming very early on. I would have taken them prophylactically, as would most sensible people and especially as there were no vaccines then available. I did the vax bit for the short period of cover they give from full blown COVID-19. The rest of the story is that’s all we’ve had available, so we had to go through lockdowns without choice.

            I have a lot of questions as to why the therapies were/are entirely blocked. As one entrant here has said, if they really are the ants pants as we were all lead to believe before they were blocked, then some people in government have a huge lot of explaining to do as to why they seem to have allowed people to die when cheap and adequate therapies were extremely available. Moreover, whoever is responsible for that block continuing, with even more knowledge being available on the efficacy of those therapies, has a huge lot of explaining to do in front of a full-on Royal Commission. My belief is that the epidemiologists advising government, and the government bureaucrats involved either had complete faith that vaccines were the only fully effective way out of this disease, as with many other diseases, and they forced vaccines-only, blocking therapeutics in an endeavour to get their panacea in place. This would have been a severely wrong decision and involved the closing of minds to what was happening around the world. The alternative and more likely theory would be that the Pharmaceutical companies would only produce the vaccines if effective therapies were blocked, because those therapies would prevent the vaccine manufacture from being economically practical. The failure of government and the medical advisers was to tolerate the deaths without continually reviewing the therapies.

            I don’t have the current smarts of many people here, but being a simple soul, I don’t see any way out of COVID without effective and efficient therapies being available on top of the short acting vaccines. It is a hard argument to refute that perhaps, once the vaccine has given its protection we would all be better off being exposed to controlled, low dose whiffs of the virus to give us the chance of establishing the much stronger multipoint acting natural immunity. It seems radical I know, but in the normal run of things, many of us are going to get the virus when the States and nation open up – as they must from a social, financial and economy point of view. Many of us will have fading vaccine-induced immune resistance when that happens and hence those prone to get the full-on effects of the disease won’t have gained much from the vaccine. I see in all this that therapeutics are a vital part of early treatment when everything opens up.

            It may be that what we see now as the great success of border blocks and lockdowns in WA, SA and the NT will come back as our biggest mistake because we will have so few people with natural immunity which comes with the NSW and Florida approach. We may yet be facing a terrible finale to COVID-19 in our States.

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    OldOzzie

    THE HYPOCRISY OF ENVIRONMENTAL ELITES

    The Wall Street Journal reports today that the insurgent members that outside groups managed to get elected to the board of ExxonMobil want the company to begin planning to go out of business:

    Exxon Debates Abandoning Some of Its Biggest Oil and Gas Projects

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  • #
    MP

    Dr Sam Bailey on misinformation. 20 mins of logic.
    https://odysee.com/@drsambailey:c/howtospotcovidmisinformation:9

    If the most contagious, most lethal disease ever, requires the massive advertising propaganda campaign, the silencing of doctors, experts, why would anyone take it.

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    OldOzzie

    Matt Canavan: Why Australia is foolish to embrace net zero emissions

    Australia is looking a gift horse in the mouth, right when it should be capitalising on its coal and gas, writes Senator Matt Canavan.

    Australia is lagging the rest of the world. Just as we are set to sign up to a net zero emissions target, everyone is in a desperate rush to get more coal, oil and gas.

    In the UK, they have reopened coal power stations because there has been a wind drought, and Vladimir Putin is not sending them as much gas as he used to.

    The US has asked Middle Eastern countries to increase oil production because the woke Wall Street bankers are no longer financing fracking in Texas.

    In China, Premier Li said this month that “coal supply is crucial to people’s lives” and that he would review China’s emissions targets in light of their recent energy crisis. He stressed that energy security was China’s priority.

    India has demanded that all coal power stations use at least 10 per cent imported coal so they can boost their fuel security.

    This is all happening because of Europe’s ill-fated attempt to reach net zero. The failure of Europe to develop their own fossil fuel resources has led to a cascading effect through world energy markets. The price of coal and gas are at record highs, which is good for Australia given we are the world’s largest exporter of both of these things.

    But we are set to look this gift horse in the mouth by signing up to a net zero emissions target. A “net” zero emissions target means that any new coal mine or gas field in Australia would need to “net” off its emissions by purchasing carbon credits. These credits cost money and will, in effect, tax the creation of working class Australian jobs.

    Over 1 million Australians work in the mining industry alone but these requirements will also impact agriculture, manufacturing and construction jobs too. A net zero target will be the first time that an Australian Government has adopted a policy to make us poorer.

    How much will these carbon credits cost? UK Government modelling shows that the carbon price will have to be A$295 per tonne to reach net zero. Julia Gillard’s $20 carbon tax increased electricity prices by 10 per cent. Electricity bills are already skyrocketing in the UK under their net zero plans, and they have a lot higher to go.

    But there will be some winners. The banks are happy with this outcome because they will trade the carbon credits. Banks are some of the biggest supporters of net zero emissions. My rule of thumb is that if something is good for the banks, it is probably bad for me.

    Turning our back on our domestic supplies of coal and gas will also mean that we will become reliant on China for our energy needs, as that is where our wind turbines and solar panels are made. All of this just as we learn that China has invented a hypersonic, nuclear capable missile that can land anywhere on earth and avoid existing missile defence systems.

    China now has space nukes but they can’t match us on plans to reach net zero.

    At the last election, Scott Morrison rightly warned of the dangers of cutting our emissions by too much. He called Labor’s proposed 45 per cent reduction in emissions a “wrecking ball through the Australian economy.”

    The working men and women of Australia agreed, and rewarded the Liberal and National parties with an unexpected victory. If we turn our backs on their jobs, the Quiet Australians will become loud and angry.

    These Australians don’t care what world leaders think of them. They just want their government to create jobs, keep living costs down and make Australia stronger.

    Matt Canavan is a Queensland Nationals Senator

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      RickWill

      A net zero target will be the first time that an Australian Government has adopted a policy to make us poorer.

      Net-Zero is a fantasy that will get more difficult to suppor as realisation sets in. It is incumbent on ScoMo to give it his full support because it is enriching Australia.

      The evidence is very clear – fairy fart extractors use tremendous amount of resources to deliver next to nothing in return. Australia can only hope that the world clamours for more of these resource hungry monsters as their demand underpins rising prices and rising demand for Australian commodities; the iron ore and met coal to convert to iron and the gas and thermal coal needed to power the economies producing them.

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      GlenM

      I guess the Nationals are going g to fold and accept the slaying of Australia’s wealth. All city commentators are against the bush saying how ignorant we are . Troy Bramston article in The Australian almost made me want to wring his neck with his asinine assumptions. This Glasgow nons6will not deliver any benefits- only the destruction of Australia’s society. It is known that we are being led by idiots and traitors.

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      Doc

      Australia has to call out the hypocrisy of those that threaten it with trade sanctions. When the chips are down in Europe and the USA, none of them are letting their own special, politically motivated, opinion based theory on AGW get in the way of obtaining fossil fuel reserves from anywhere they can get them. They are all exposed frauds and are destroying their own nations to introduce some queer ideas about the world would run better with them in charge. You know, the case where the common people will own nothing and live happily with these frauds telling us how to live.

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    Brenda Spence

    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2021/10/the_unvaccinated_are_looking_smarter_every_week.html

    According to the study, what’s the educational level with the most vaccine hesitancy? Ph.D. level! Those can’t all have been awarded to liberal arts majors. Clearly, scientists who can read the data and assess risk are among the least likely to take the mRNA vaccines.

    But this is my favourite quote

    Why do the protected need to be protected from the unprotected by forcing the unprotected to use the protection that did not protect the protected in the first place?”

    If the vaccine works to prevent infection, then the vaccinated have nothing to worry about. If the vaccine does not prevent infection, then the vaccinated remain at some risk, and the unvaccinated would be less likely to choose a vaccine that does not work well.

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      OldOzzie

      This vast Phase 3 clinical trial of mRNA vaccines in which Americans are participating mostly out of fear is not going well. It is abundantly clear for anyone advocating for public health that the vaccination program should be stopped. Iceland has just stopped giving the Moderna vaccine to anyone which is a good step in the right direction. Sweden, Denmark, and Finland have banned the Moderna vaccine for anyone under the age of 30.

      VAERS, our vaccine adverse effect reporting system, showed at the beginning of this week 16,000 deaths, 23,000 disabilities, 10,000 MI/myocarditis, 87,000 urgent care visits, 75,000 hospital stays, and 775,000 total adverse events. The VAERS system is widely known to under-report events, with an estimated 90 to 99% of events going unreported there.

      Eudravigilance, the European reporting system now associates 26,000 deaths in close proximity to administration of the vaccine. Whistleblower data from the CMS system (Medicare charts) showed close to 50,000 deaths in the Medicare group shortly after the vaccine.

      An AI-powered tracking program called Project Salus also follows the Medicare population and shows vaccinated Medicare recipients are having worse outcomes week by week of the type consistent with Antibody Dependent Enhancement.

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      Serp

      And now Biden’s gang has announced its latest crime: twenty-eight million children aged five to eleven years old are to be vaccinated as quickly as possible.

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        Hanrahan

        Sting wrote and sang Russians, with the theme that Russia won’t start a war “If Russians loved their children too”.

        It seems the US no longer loves their children enough not to use them as pawns in a political war. They are taught gender fluidity and race hatred as tots and now Biden needs to sacrifice them to prove “he cares”.

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      OldOzzie

      One Nation sticking up for freedom and anti-discrimination over vaccines.

      Malcolm Roberts Flag of Australia
      @MRobertsQLD

      This morning I had the pleasure of introducing the ‘COVID-19 Vaccination Status (Prevention of Discrimination) Bill 2021’ on behalf of Senator Hanson prohibiting discrimination on the basis of whether a person has had a COVID vaccination.

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        Senator Roberts wont get his bill passed but it is a pity it has to be. In the ACT we have a human rights commission that has powers to block legislation that impinges on rights https://hrc.act.gov.au/humanrights/covid-19-lockdown-and-your-rights/#Vac

        A blanket rule or condition that requires vaccination as a condition of entry or service is unlikely to be consistent with ACT discrimination law. If a provider of goods and services has refused you service because you have not been vaccinated you may be able to make a complaint to the Commission.

        I didn’t paste the two paragraphs that precede the following but they are worth reading as they make it clear that the bar is a high one for justifying anything the discriminates based on vaccination status.

        If an employer makes vaccinations a mandatory condition of employment, this could amount to discrimination if exceptions are not made for employees who cannot be vaccinated due to a disability or other attribute protected under the ACT’s discrimination laws. If your employer is treating you unfavourably because you have not been vaccinated, you may be able to make a complaint to the Commission.

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    OldOzzie

    John Ratcliffe Offers Incisive Analysis of China’s Hypersonic Missile Test, Destroys Biden and Psaki in the Process

    Someone who understood the portent of the missile launch in no uncertain terms was John Ratcliffe, Director of National Intelligence from 2020 to 2021. During a Wednesday appearance on Fox News’ “America’s Newsroom,” Ratcliffe told co-hosts Bill Hemmer and Dana Perino that reporting has not been accurate in the respect that the U.S. was caught flatfooted by the launch.

    U.S. intelligence has been aware of Chinese hypersonic tests since 2013 and Ratcliffe said that when he was DNI, he commissioned and cleared several intelligence products on the state of Chinese hypersonics.

    “China [is] attending to dominate us economically, technologically, and militarily,” Ratcliffe warned, “and this is all part of why I called for increased spending on China and why there has to be a greater focus and influence on this, going forward.”

    “I know that the Biden administration wants them to be a strategic competitor — I wish they were — but they are proving themselves with each passing day to be the ruthless autocracy that kills and tortures its own citizens, that lies, cheats, and steals in the global marketplace, and is responsible — at least as a proximate cause — for 5 million people dying from a pandemic that started in China, last year.”

    “That’s who China is,” Ratcliffe stressed.

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      Forrest Gardener

      The headline got my attention when it talks about destroying Biden and Psaki.

      How exactly do you destroy Biden or Psaki?

      Rhetorically it is like trying to destroy a pile of manure. At best there is just as much manure as before and now it is spread randomly all over the place.

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    Brenda Spence

    This is a real worry if it is true.

    Latest UK PHE Vaccine Surveillance Report figures on Covid cases show that doubly vaccinated 40-70 year olds have lost 40% of their immune system capability compared to unvaccinated people. Their immune systems are deteriorating at around 5% per week (between 2.7% and 8.7%). If this continues then 30-50 year olds will have 100% immune system degradation, zero viral defence by Christmas and all doubly vaccinated people over 30 will have lost their immune systems by March next year.

    https://theexpose.uk/2021/10/15/its-worse-than-we-thought-fully-covid-vaccinated-ade/

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      OldOzzie

      Coronavirus world: Novavax a strong contender for booster jabs, US to allow ‘mix and match’ vaccine booster
      Australia has bought 51 million doses of Novavax – and that’s a wise move going by the latest research into the yet to be approved vaccine.

      Sue Dunlevy

      October 20, 2021 – 1:55PM
      News Corp Australia Network

      The Novavax vaccine purchased by Australia is emerging as a strong candidate for booster jabs with new research showing it has fewer side effects.

      The company told a Spanish medical conference overnight Tuesday that Oxford university research had found it was well tolerated when given as a second dose of vaccine after either an AstraZeneca or Pfizer shot.

      The research showed the vaccine was the “least reactogenic” (had fewer side effects) of the mixed dose regimes, Filip Dubovsky, MD, Executive Vice President, Chief Medical Officer, Novavax said.

      It may also “offer advantages over other widely used Covid vaccines in inducing neutralizing antibodies against the Delta and Beta variants,” he said.

      There is growing evidence that mixing and matching vaccines may produce a stronger immune response.

      Australia has purchased 51 million doses of Novavax which is due to be delivered late 2021. However, the company has yet to receive regulatory approval for the vaccine anywhere in the world.

      Early safety studies showed the most commonly reported side effects to Novavax were pain and tenderness at the injection site and around two in three people experienced headache, fatigue and myalgia.

      Most reactions were mild or moderate, but were greater following the second dose.

      So far Australian regulators have approved booster doses of Covid vaccines only for immunocompromised people.

      Government advisory bodies are expected to make a ruling on booster doses for the elderly and frontline health workers in coming weeks.
      The Australian Medical Association is calling for the process to be sped up as there are fears of waning vaccine efficacy among many frontline health workers who received vaccines almost eight months ago.

      Multiple studies have found the efficacy of the Pfizer vaccine declines rapidly after four months and the US, the UK and Israel have approved booster doses.

      The FDA in the US is expected to rule on the need for booster doses of the Moderna vaccine this week.

      Can’t find link – Was a Daily Telegraph Article yesterday but seems to have disappeared.

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      Are you donating to “the expose” Brenda? Are you willing to be complicit with an outfit that is deliberately misinforming its audience. Anyone with even a pinch of knowledge on the subject can see what they did. Why though? To get more donations?

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      MP

      The pure bloods don’t have to worry about this.

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      Regarding the Expose Story. Am I missing something? I see data on people’s response to SARS2 which is very interesting (thanks). The negative and sliding “Vax Efficacy” is indeed attention grabbing. But I don’t see any measure of ” immune system capability” against any other disease? Is there any data there that is really comparable to AIDS?

      And if the alternate mRNA nucleotides stop the Toll receptors working permanently, I would still assume that it’s a certain proportion of cells affected, not every cell. (The injections are a few mls of material. How concentrated is that dose?). With most chemicals, the body will slowly degrade or excrete the problem molecule. Perhaps these are artificial molecules and they stick around a long time, in which case the second dose would add to the problem. But I would want to see some data on both which cells were taking up the mRNA vax, the proportion of cells affected and what the clearance rates are.

      —-

      And on a different vein — in this para below is an assumption that the Vaxxed and Unvaxxed behave the same way and take the same risks.

      “A Vaccine efficacy of 0% means that doubly vaccinated people are 0% more protected from Covid than unvaxxed people. It means that the delta case rate in the vaxxed equals the delta case rate in the unvaxxed. It means the vaccines have lost all their effectiveness.”

      If the Vaxxed are dancing at nightclubs and the unvaxxed are not the two groups are not easily comparable and 0% doesn’t mean 0% in the same circumstances. It’s also possible that it’s the more wary people who are vaxxed and they might be restricting themselves.

      The vaxxed may be avoiding testing because they assume they can’t catch Covid, or because they are getting more asymptomatic infections — which would make the vax look more effective than it is. On the other hand perhaps the Unvaxxed are avoiding testing because they are suspicious of the tests, the virus, and the government.

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        Is there any data there that is really comparable to AIDS?

        No, hence my response “deliberately misinforming its audience.”

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        None of this surprises me as it has not been possible for a vaccine to have been developed to combat a virus where that virus is a virus that can be transferred from Animals to Humans. That is my understanding but then again I am not an expert in the field of medicines.

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    John Connor II

    CNN is reporting that a new study involving over 600,000 veterans has found that Johnson & Johnson’s covid vaccine’s protection “fell from 88% in March to 3% in August.”

    “A study published Thursday reported a steep decline in vaccine effectiveness against infection by August of this year, especially for people who received the J&J vaccine,” CNN reported over the weekend. “The researchers found that among more than 600,000 veterans, J&J’s vaccine’s protection fell from 88% in March to 3% in August.”

    The whole plandemic is being exposed worldwide now if CNN runs the above story!

    88% – RRR effectiveness
    3% – just above ARR effectiveness.
    Just coincidence.
    Wait for the sheeple to roll up their sleeves for yet another shot of the same.
    And for what reason!?

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    John Connor II

    …and today’s totally credible and impartial news brought to you by…

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XlL5_kKyLA0

    I’m sure that the Aussie govt and TGA would never be even partly funded by that which they promote! Oh hang on…

    Meanwhile in the #1 “test lab” called Israel…oh dear…what a revelation!

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    Brenda Spence

    What is this Digital Identity thing all about?

    A few people are questioning it’s agenda. This from George Christensen.

    I’m reading more up on this Digital ID bill. I do have some concerns. Your views on it are welcome and make sure you provide your feedback to the government as well. Details at the link.

    https://www.digitalidentity.gov.au/have-your-say/phase-3/submission-form?fbclid=IwAR31aa4SvoGDHzRKOjnNQR3R-yiigexTYWp9ItuztSAGeKqDeRRuvabeQEg

    Subscribe: t.me/gchristensen

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      David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

      G’day Brenda and thanks,
      We were pointed to the submission link from a different direction, so you beat me to posting it. I’ve made my submission, an objection, as it sounds too much like the proposed Australia Card, rejected in a referendum some years back. Only worse.

      The ability to comment is only open till October 27.

      Cheers
      Dave B

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    domm. bpbdomm

    Dr. Malik Peiris who previously served on the Lancet medical journal’s COVID-19 origins investigation committee, received China’s “Nobel Prize” for research affirming the Chinese Communist Party’s false narrative that COVID-19 developed naturally.
    Peiris, a Sri Lankan virologist working in Hong Kong, was one of 12 scientists leading the now-defunct Lancet probe into the origins of COVID-19. While the task force is no longer listed on the medical journal’s website, as it was forced to disband due to extensive conflicts of interests with the Wuhan Institute of Virology, archived web pages reveal Peiris’s participation in the effort. https://thenationalpulse.com/exclusive/lancet-covid-investigator-wins-china-nobel-prize/

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    David Maddison

    What is the earliest references you know to using the term favoured by the Left of what they call “carbon” (sic) pollution?

    In Australia I think it was Gillard who first used it.

    And in the US it was Gore.

    But are there earlier references?

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      John+R+Smith

      Didn’t it start when Maggie Thatcher was trying to counter the power of coal mining unions?
      They attacked the unions by labeling coal an environmental threat.
      And here we are.

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        David Maddison

        Margaret Thatcher used the supposed threat of global warming as a means to promote nuclear power and break the feral coal mining union but she was a scientist and so never would have referred to carbon dioxide as “carbon pollution” (sic). I could find no reference to her using that term. In her autobiography she retracted her belief in anthropogenic global warming.

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        I think he means the specific term “carbon pollution”

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          hypersonic

          I think the term pollution used in this context is not to mean toxic or poison but merely too much. A good example of this type of language would mean a flood caused by excessive rain could be construed as water pollution. Obviously its an abuse of the english language but many people do not have a very good grasp of it to begin with hence its success in instilling fear into people instead of the comic relief it deserves.

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            I agree with this. I think the term pollution once universally described is something immediate and somewhat localised. English doesn’t have a word that describes the phenomenon you describe (ie too much water and too much CO2). I bet there is something in German.

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              farmerbraun

              . . superfluity , excess,overabundance, oversupply,surfeit,overflow . . . .?

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                I guess words like that are adequate but they don’t describe the damage/consequence like pollution does (pretend for a minute that CO2 causes damage for the purposes of this discussion).

                “Pollution” also is a noun on its own which seems useful and probably helps it to catch on as it has with “carbon pollution”

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                clarence.t

                “(pretend for a minute that CO2 causes damage for the purposes of this discussion)”

                Ahh….. ga defines the AGW meme to a “t”

                Just pretend !!!

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                clarence.t

                ““carbon pollution””

                A totally nonsense, non-science piece of meaningless terminology.

                Fits perfectly with the AGW meme, and those that follow it.

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                David Maddison

                Another reason to object to the term “carbon pollution” (sic) is that most people who use it would not understand what is being referred to anyway.

                If they can’t say “carbon dioxide” or know what it is, then they are not qualified to debate the topic.

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        Here in the US the, war on coal used a slew of bogus scares that had nothing to do with CO2. SO2 and acid rain, NOx and smog, Mercury as poison, PM2.5 causing cancer. We lost the war 20 years ago. The power industry had a building boom and suddenly added 200,000 MW of new generation in 2021. ALL GAS FIRED. Demand went flat and gas was cheap thanks to fracking so they started switching from coal to gas. But the growing pile of punitive regulations caused the build that enabled the switch.

        Mind you we still burn 600,000,000 tons a year of coal, but that is down from an even billion tons and slated to keep going down, unless the new high price on gas gives pause. The war ain’t over but coal is not doing well.

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          Graeme No.3

          A thought bubble?
          What if the coal suppliers turned the coal into gas? Easily done and old (over a century) technology, resulting in a mixture of CO2, CO and Hydrogen. This could be pumped directly into gas plants. The CO2 would reduce efficiency but also reduce combustion temperature which is a problem with hydrogen. The result would be less than 62% efficiency of natural gas fired CCGTs but higher than even the newest coal fired technology, so less overall CO2 emissions?

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          David, you mention this:

          …..the power industry had a building boom and suddenly added 200,000 MW of new generation in 2021. ALL GAS FIRED.

          I have been watching (and documenting) this now for more than thirteen years, since early 2008.

          I found that the U.S. EIA was a vast database for information, and everything I wanted to know was covered there.

          Have a look at this Table for power generation from the EIA. (shown at this link) It’s ‘interactive’ and if you hover your mouse over the graph, it will give the totals for each power generating source at that time. The upper (blue) line shows coal fired power.

          Now see where it hovers along an almost straight line at the top, and then there is the beginning of the sudden drop. Hover your mouse there and you’ll see that the date is (end of year) 2008. For coal fired power, it was delivering at that time just a tick under 2,000TWH of power, out of a U.S. total power generation of 3500TWH, so coal fired power was delivering 57% of all the generated power.

          Then, as you can see, it fell over the cliff. And at around the same time, natural gas fired power began ramping up.

          However, at the same time of the fall for coal fired power and the beginning of ramping up for natural gas fired power, there was a really interesting statistic that very few people even noticed at all, and in the rush to vilify coal fired power, they artfully neglected to even mention it.

          The AVERAGE age of ALL the coal fired Power plant Units in the whole of the U.S. at the end of 2008 was forty nine and a half years.

          Read that again. The ….. ‘AVERAGE’ age for ‘ALL’ coal fired power was just under 50 years.

          So, for that to be the average, probably more than half of them were older than 50 years.

          So, in actual fact, what had happened here was that those older, now ancient Units shut down, not out of obeisance to the anti CO2 emitting green lobby, but because they were nearly all of them time expired.

          So they shut down, and to (almost seamlessly) replace all of that lost power generation, they constructed new Natural Gas fired Units, all across the U.S.

          Something similar happened here in Australia, only without the replacement power generation being constructed.

          The ‘greenies’ would like to point to all those coal fired plants which have closed here in Australia, and loudly proclaim that ….. ‘Look, we got them closed down.

          Those older plants here in Oz (and even as late as 2008 to 2012, there were still a lot of them around) were used solely for ‘rolling reserve’. In other words, when one of the operational plants had a scheduled outage for maintenance, well, a few days beforehand, those old plants ramped up one or sometimes two of their Units, so that as the ‘Major’ went offline, then the rolling reserve took over, seamlessly delivering the power now not available from the major.

          It was as regular as clockwork, and you could see it on the Load Curve graphs, one old one Up, the major down, and when the work was over, the reverse.

          However, now with costs rising, and also maybe for publicity purposes, that all stopped. Gradually, those now ancient ‘rolling reserve’ plants just shut down totally, and then, just like Hazelwood a couple of days back they ‘blew em up’, with cameras in attendance.

          Now, harking back to the U.S. the same could also be said here. Those ancient old coal fired clunkers were closed down, and as they were mainly used as ‘rolling reserve’ they were now replaced by OCGT Natural Gas plants, used as what are referred to as ‘Peakers’, to supply power when needed for the Peaks and outages, exactly the same as for those old rolling reserve plants.

          Now, no need to read all of this long list, (shown at this link) but just look at the dates for the retirement of coal fired plants in the U.S. and just note the ages of virtually every one of them, longer than 50 years, oh, and to confirm one of the other things I have also mentioned across the years, the Units which are shut down, are all of them, small Units, with very few of them the larger 500MW Plus Units. So, smaller 50 to 150MW coal fired units replaced by 350MW Plus gas fired plants, so you can close half a dozen of those old coal fired Units and open just one medium/large gas fired Units.

          See how there’s always two sides to every story, just that the ‘inconvenient’ one, umm, doesn’t need to be mentioned, eh!

          Tony.

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            Rowjay

            Hello Tony – I have noticed over the last week or so that our natural gas generation has been “subdued” during peak generation periods – does Oz have a current supply problem with natural gas?

            BTW – it’s nearing the end of October and my ducted gas system is still firing up occasionally in the Canberra bubble – struggling to get up to 20 degC during the day and low single digits overnight. All of those interesting weather events to my north must be due to the escaping Antarctic cold mass hitting the warm tropical north systems.

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        Strop

        She did address the UN in 1989 about CO2 emmissions referring to “carbon” and “greenhouse gasses” and “industrial pollution”.
        She even used the word “unprecendented”.

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnAzoDtwCBg

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      OldOzzie

      Glasgow bandwagon careering out of control

      Peta Credlin

      Before any of the Coalition’s MPs get too excited about supposedly ending the climate wars, they need to remember how they got into government and why they’re still there. They’re in government because Tony Abbott won a landslide election promising to repeal the carbon tax, giving them a big enough buffer of seats to survive the subsequent revolving-door prime ministership.

      They’re still in government only because at the 2019 election the Coalition had modest emissions targets and could cost and explain them. Labor had much bigger emissions targets that it couldn’t explain and wouldn’t cost. That’s why this conversion to net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, in senator Matt Canavan’s words, looks like a betrayal of the quiet Australians.

      Trying to make the new policy palatable, Scott Morrison has let it be known that the government has modelling purporting to show that Australia’s agricultural, resource and gas exports will be even higher – yes, even higher under net zero – in 2050 than they are now.

      But hang on, before the 2019 election, to blast Labor’s policy as reckless, the Prime Minister cited modelling that cutting emissions by 45 per cent would cumulatively cost 336,000 jobs, cut wages by $9000 and reduce gross domestic product by a half trillion dollars.

      So then the modelling said a 45 per cent cut would crush the economy; now the modelling supposedly says a much bigger cut – effectively 100 per cent – will boost the economy? Go figure.

      This week’s reported but not released government modelling apparently claims that in 2050 gas exports will exceed today’s figures in volume and in price. How does this square with last week’s International Energy Agency modelling that fossil fuels will go from about 80 per cent of the world’s total energy now to only 22 per cent in 2050; or Wednesday’s UK Treasury modelling that assumes getting to net zero will require a $92 a tonne carbon price in 2030 and a $295 a tonne price in 2050 (compared with Julia Gillard’s 2012 carbon tax of just $23)?

      Despite all the hype about renewables being cheap and creating green jobs, in every country more renewable power has meant higher costs, lower reliability and the flight of manufacturing industry to China. Just look at the energy crisis hitting Britain and western Europe because of a wind drought and skyrocketing demand for gas.

      Frankly, it staggers me that so many Coalition MPs have been prepared to jump on the COP26 bandwagon, which is careering out of control because nothing is ever enough to satisfy the climate warriors. Almost as soon as the Coalition agreed in 2015 to a 26 to 28 per cent cut by 2030 (because that was achievable within policy settings) the campaign began for more.

      First, the demand was to commit to net zero by 2050. And as soon as the government started signalling that it would, the demand became higher targets for 2030. Now that it looks like existing policy will deliver a 36 per cent cut, the demand is for further cuts requiring costly and disruptive change. If the latest demand is for a 45 to 50 per cent cut by 2030, you can be certain that in a couple of years the demand will be net zero by 2040 or sooner. This is allegedly because otherwise the planet will face catastrophe; the same catastrophe that has been just around the corner for decades that stubbornly has never come.

      The reason nothing is ever enough for the climate cult is because the objective is less to save the planet than to change the way we live; and if that makes us more vulnerable to China and Russia, so much the better.

      Old-school Marxists were never able to persuade Western workers to revolt for equality, but today’s cultural Marxists have been much better at persuading Western elites to revolt to save the planet. This is even though China and Russia are doing no such thing and indicating their contempt for the whole emission obsession by absenting themselves from Glasgow.

      What’s curious and (to long-term Liberal supporters) galling is that so many Coalition MPs have become the latest useful idiots in this campaign.

      By sticking with the current targets for 2030 while committing to net zero for 2050, the Prime Minister thinks he is shrewdly satisfying the inner-city Liberals on climate and the regional Liberals on jobs. If, as is likely, this is criticised as not enough by greens and too much by conservatives, he’ll doubtless claim that being attacked from both sides shows he has got it right.

      An alternative interpretation is that this is a bloke who, under pressure, can’t stick with the same position from one election to the next and thus stands for nothing.

      Of itself, that’s enough to leave Morrison with a credibility gap. This will be willingly exploited by a raft of minor parties on the right, with messaging hits about the impact of net zero on low-income households, small business and regional communities, once bread-and-butter constituencies for the Coalition but looking more and more as if they’ve been abandoned in favour of the UN, big-business rent-seekers and virtue-signalling billionaires.

      If decarbonising the economy really is an “unstoppable change”, why does it need to be mandated and subsidised by government?

      And if it must be mandated by government, surely it’s high time to embrace the only proven way to produce emissions-free electricity via a government commitment to develop a civil nuclear industry.

      Japan has quietly rethought its post-Fukushima commitment to phase out nuclear. France has just shelved its plan to reduce reliance on nuclear. And Britain is about to announce a big increase in its nuclear power program.

      This week there have been pro-nuclear demonstrations in Belgium; and Bill Gates, hardly a conservative climate denier, has declared that nuclear power should “absolutely” be politically acceptable because it’s safer than oil, coal and gas. For climate activists still opposed to nuclear power, the real agenda is not green energy but less energy; it’s economic and social re-engineering disguised as saving the planet.

      For Morrison, who needs to keep his team united and enthusiastic, the advantage of using nuclear to get to net zero is that his political fight will no longer be against his own natural supporters but a Labor Party with the double standard of supporting nuclear power at sea but not on land.

      The Prime Minister’s colleagues suggesting that net zero was the blood price for “modern Liberal” votes to take over from Malcolm Turnbull might have a point – but what a price if they end up back in opposition for no environmental gain and a world of economic pain.

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        Forrest Gardener

        I haven’t kept track of how often she is proven right or wrong in the fullness of time but I do enjoy reading her arguments. My biggest regret is that she was unable to engineer a longer prime ministership for Tony Abbott.

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    David Maddison

    This is an interview with the last Nuremberg Trials prosecutor still living. He is 101 years old.

    https://youtu.be/_FLMRa9WOh4

    It also ought to be a reminder to politicians and public serpents and even corporations that they will not escape justice for their crimes and that “just following orders” is not an excuse. (Noting that the leadership of Krupp and IG Farben were prosecuted for participating in crimes.)

    Sadly, I think a lot of younger people have never even heard of these Trials.

    It is especially relevant to Australia today as this country slides into dictatorship.

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    David Maddison

    This video (link below) is a very good rebuttal to Leftists who say we should stop eating meat and start eating plants and insects in order to “save the planet”.

    To date there have not been very many comprehensive rebuttals about the supposed inappropriate land, water and energy use and “carbon” (sic) pollution supposedly created by raising tasty animals to BBQ for human consumption.

    https://youtu.be/sGG-A80Tl5g

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  • #
    Peter C

    Covid Now.

    Stand by. Case numbers are increasing again in Victoria, NSW and the ACT. Why is that?
    https://covidlive.com.au/states-and-territories

    In the meantime covidlive has again changed the way that the numbers of vaccinated people in hospital are presented.
    https://covidlive.com.au/report/daily-vaccination-status/vic

    We used to see; unvaccinated, partial and fully vaccinated. Now only the fully vaccinated numbers are shown. Numbers are still small but increasing.

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      David Maddison

      The vaccines are not “sterilising” so people will continue to get infected and infect others. Sooner or later most people will get infected symptomatically or asymptomatically or until herd immunity is established.

      This is especially true as anti-virals such as HCQ and IVM are banned in Australia for covid management plus there is no general consciousness of the importance of micronutrients such as Vit D and zinc in providing resistance to covid. The latter two micronutrients tend to be deficient in the two most vulnerable groups, the obese and elderly.

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        Hanrahan

        The latter two micronutrients tend to be deficient in the two most vulnerable groups, the obese and elderly.

        and minority groups, none of whom will be reading here or anywhere else where critical thought might be found.

        I don’t know Syd but I believe that its hotspots are centred in ethnic communities where many can’t read the language in which essential info will be printed. They are also less likely to eat red meat [Zn & NAC] for cost and cultural reasons.

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          MP

          I am white, a minority group.
          I am un-altered, a minority group.

          And I read here. where critical thought might be found. Probably got me on that though.

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    • #

      Case numbers are rubbish as the test is false……………..QED

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    hypersonic

    Inmates at Canberra prison are exempt from the VAX mandate, so there you go a prisoner has more rights than law abiding citizens in the ACT.

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    • #
      Serp

      Not so if I’ve properly understood Gee Aye’s frequent bragging about statutory human rights in the ACT.

      30

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      RobB

      What are they going to do if the inmates refuse the vax? Kick them out? Fire them?

      20

    • #
      John+R+Smith

      we have a bit of an interesting situation here in the US.
      Many veterans appear to be believe that the VA will start denying health care to the un-injected.
      I can’t find any conformation.
      It seems to me, the Brandon administration is perfectly fine with allowing this perception to fester as a form pressure or … as a provocation.
      (It’s odd, vax mandates apparently have not been ‘officially signed’ in and are far as I can tell, just perceived as so by the public. Nuremburg defense?)
      Many veterans are expressing anger, as in ‘granny get yer gat’ anger.
      Brandon, the Unity POTUS, along with Princess of Darkness Pelosi, appear to be heck bent on dividing the nation into two …
      Vaxocrats and Insurrectionists.

      I am considering crossing into Mexico, and sneaking back across the border to avoid jab mandates.
      And to make renewing my license easier.
      Just kidding, I’ve had all my shots.

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    • #

      There is no vaccine mandate for ordinary residents. The only mandates are for health professionals, aged care carers etc. Also primary school teachers up until the time that students can also be vaccinated.

      00

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        MP

        Ambulance, taxi drivers, fire department. But its the coercion, most people I know have taken it, not because they are afraid of the virus, but so they can go to the pub, travel, gym.
        A disease so deadly you have to be coerced and threatened, does not make sense.

        10

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    hypersonic

    A Brazilian Senate report is recommending crimes against humanity and other charges be pursued against President Jair Bolsonaro for allegedly bungling Brazil’s response to COVID-19 and contributing to the country having the world’s second-highest pandemic death toll.

    A 96 your old man is currently facing charges of accessory to murder in the Hague his crime being the secretary of an SS commander. Once the dust settles on the current depopulation bomb AKA COVID-19 and its associated vaccines i think the Hague will be a very busy place.

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      Forrest Gardener

      Whether the Hague will become busy or not depends on finding people willing to do the prosecuting.

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    Peter+Fitzroy

    Good news – coal is tipped to soar, independent of the posturing at the “climate conference” As an example Great Britain is planning a new mine, with approval to coincide with COP26. Even the Guardian is reporting on the gap between what is being said and what is happening

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      Graeme No.3

      Would that be the Cumberland mine? For metallurgical coal to replace imports.
      I doubt that old coal mines would be safe to re-open after years of neglect.

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        Hanrahan

        A friend drove me around an open cut coal mine at Clermont. He pointed out the old exposed shafts. Part of his job was to separate the old timbers from the mined coal.

        So old deposits can still be mined.

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      Raving

      Yes with the government handing out £5,000 grants to switch to a heat pumps, they can afford to build a new coal mine

      How much does it cost for a new roof in the UK?

      50

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        David Maddison

        Yes. £5000 against a gas boiler costing £6000 to £18000.

        I wonder where they’ll get the electricity to run those plus the electric cars?

        It certainly won’t be coming from windmills or panels.

        And I wonder how long before the heat pump campaign comes to Australia?

        https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-57159056

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          yarpos

          Woudnt need much of a campaign here they are already pretty popular. Split systems are everywhere and we have friends and family that have gone with heat pump hot water in new builds over the last couple of years.

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            Raving

            Splt system? Not sure what you mean. Heat pump can both heat and cool. usually forced air.

            A heat pump at +10 deg C is not the same as a heat pump at -10 deg C. Here -10 C for days at a time in winter means the house needs in ground heat exchanger and strong insulation including double glazing+.

            It would cost me £3,000 just to replace one air con compressor to a newer refrigerant.

            Replacing windows and insulating between a double layer of bricks is costly.. Laying a ground antifreeze heat exchanger system is a big deal. Then there is the high capacity heat pump. Summer A/C is the easier side of things.

            And then the temperature goes down to – 20 deg C too

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              yarpos

              Its another name for the same thing , we have been using split systems/heat pumps for decades, more so now as they have gotten cheaper and now its a virtue item also.

              I beleive our cousins in NZ prefer the heat pump terminology also.

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            Raving

            Heat pumps might be an easy solution for Australia if it rarely gets below 0 deg C. Get much colder and there are big problems because it’s much harder to extract heat from colder air.

            Failing window and wall insulation can also change a slowly heatable home into an unwarmable chiller. Asystem designed to work max out at 0 deg C lacks the big reserve needed to heat a house when the temp drops to -10

            If everyone swiches to space heaters the electric usage will go through the roof

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              Lucky

              In Australia every air-con system for heating that I have seen states that it uses electrical power to warm the internals when temperatures drop. That temp would be a bit above freezing.
              When heat exchangers are encased in ice, there is negligible no heat transfer.
              So for that type of design, expect efficiency for heating in UK to be very low.
              Thus very high electricity use.

              We read about that earlier this year in Texas.

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          Raving

          Would have thought a heat pump was much more viable in Australia. Essentially a dual function heat/cool air conditioner

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            Graeme No.3

            Yes, but… I noticed that my heat pump didn’t work very long when the outside temperature was 1.4℃ as the coils iced up. Had to shut it down for an hour or so (didn’t freeze, room was 12-13℃ and my computer was in a room with direct electric heating. I assume that at minus 10℃ there would be less ice???
            Equally I remember years ago going outside when the temperature was 40℃ and misting distilled water onto the coils (evaporation absorbed some heat and the effect inside the room was near instantaneous, if only lasting 1-2 minutes).

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        yarpos

        whats cost of a roof got to do with anything?

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      • #

        For good ness sake, the British Isles and England are made of coal. Now, how economical it is to get the stuff out is another issue. But it is all there and when the next Mini Ice Age or any other Ice Age starts it will be invaluable.

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      MP

      Stop it, just stop it. Can we please go back to the old normal, pre Tuesday unthreaded.

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        Annie

        I like the Unthreadeds; plenty of interesting stuff crops up. If you aren’t keen you can always ignore them.

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          MP

          This is Peter Fitzroy, king of the reds. The below comment got no reds, the comment I responded to got one and 6 other.

          I am referring to this inverse world I am now living in. I liked the old normal.

          Peter+Fitzroy
          October 19, 2021 at 10:51 am · Reply
          no Raving, I am supporting this:
          “So we, as skeptics, have two choices — one is to support every last democratically elected representative and to protest, protest, protest! If there were giant marches in the streets it gives Scott Morrison more ammunition” (my bold)

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    David Maddison

    I wonder what the Chicomms have planned for the next plandemic?

    OR

    It could be a completely natural pandemic.

    Let’s hope Marburg virus doesn’t start spreading due to either natural or artificial means.

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    David Maddison

    How stupid can you be?

    A plane made an emergency landing at La Guardia airport because a passenger reported another passenger for having a bomb when in fact it was a vintage camera.

    I bet the passenger who made the report was a Biden voter…

    https://www.popphoto.com/news/psa-vintage-cameras-arent-bombs/

    BY HARRY GUINNESS | UPDATED OCT 19, 2021 3:12 PM

    PSA: Vintage cameras aren’t bombs and you shouldn’t be afraid to travel with one

    An overzealous airline passenger recently mistook another passenger’s vintage camera for a bomb detonator, forcing an emergency landing. Fortunately, no arrests were made and no one was hurt.

    On October 10th, a flight from Indianapolis to New York’s LaGuardia Airport made an emergency landing at its destination after a passenger mistook a vintage camera for a bomb. 

    Mistaken for a bomb detonator

    According to the NY Daily News, an unidentified woman traveling with her husband and children saw the (as yet) unidentified photographer looking at photos and videos of vintage cameras on his phone. 

    “She thought he was looking up bomb-making instructions, and when the man pulled out his own camera and adjusted it she was convinced he was setting a timer on a detonator.”

    She alerted the cabin crew triggering the emergency landing procedure. Once the plane was on the ground, the unsuspecting vintage camera fan was tackled by emergency responders and taken into custody. He was detained for several hours while his bags were searched—shockingly, they contained more vintage cameras—before being released without charge as “no criminality” had occurred. 

    Unpacking what happened

    There are several layers of ridiculousness to this whole mess. Leaving aside the sheer bad manners of staring at someone else’s phone screen during a flight, it also seems pretty unlikely that a terrorist would look up instructions for their bomb mid-flight. Also, how old or large was this camera that it could be mistaken for a detonator?

    The SLR and rangefinder formats have been pretty consistent since the 1930s—and they’re kind of distinctive. Any report that portrays this as an emergency landing caused by the photographer’s “erratic behavior”—looking at you New York Times—is straight-up wrong. This incident was caused by someone’s overblown paranoia, not a vintage camera. Thankfully, no one was hurt in the evacuation. And the photographer appears not to have suffered too badly at the hands of the first responders.

    SEE LINK FOR REST

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    Robber

    When is Scomo going to release the “secret modelling” that shows Australia’s pathway to net zero?
    Apparently it miraculously shows that enforcing net zero will create more jobs and more wealth.
    Without a costed roadmap to get there it is pie in the sky.
    It’s not enough to repeat the mantra that unreliable renewables will get cheaper. We need to know how every coal power station will be replaced with dispatchable electricity supplies and at what cost. Promising more government handouts to regions and industries (and consumers?) is not a satisfactory answer. In fact it implies that Australia will become less competitive and we will all pay.
    And there really is a pot of gold at the end of every rainbow.

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      OldOzzie

      When is Scomo going to release the “secret modelling” that shows Australia’s pathway to net zero?

      About the same time as DIctator Dan – Daniel Andrews baulks at releasing Covid-19 lockdown advice

      The Andrews government is refusing to say whether it will comply with orders from Victoria’s privacy watchdog to release documents detailing the basis for the state’s lockdown in February.

      The Office of the Victorian Information Commissioner on Tuesday ordered the government to release 176 Health Department documents detailing the advice that guided the government’s ­decision to enforce a stage four lockdown on February 1.

      At the time, chief health officer Brett Sutton and Premier Daniel Andrews said the five-day “circuit-breaker” lockdown was necessary to control the “hyper-infectious” UK variant of Covid, which had ­escaped into the community as a result of infection control breaches at the Melbourne Airport Holiday Inn quarantine hotel.

      In its attempt to block the release of the material, the Department of Health said the files revealed “high-level deliberative processes of government” and risked jeopardising trust between public officials and a minister.

      OVIC ruled that the public had a right to the information, with deputy commissioner Joanne Kummrow finding: “I consider members of the public are capable of understanding the role of the chief health officer to make decisions and issue directions under the public health and wellbeing act.”

      Ms Kummrow also said the documents “contained a substantial amount of publicly available information”.

      The Andrews government has so far refused to release documents detailing the justifications for all six of Victoria’s lockdowns — which have seen Melburnians subjected to 262 days of stay-at-home orders.

      This means the forced release of the documents for the February lockdown could set a precedent for the others.

      Asked on Wednesday whether the government would follow OVIC’s orders to release the documents, senior minister Danny Pearson said the matter was under active consideration but refused to say whether the government would comply

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        OldOzzie

        VictoriaStan – Lockdown for 12 cases Open for Covid-19 latest: Victoria records 2232 Covid cases ahead of new freedoms; NSW records 372 cases, one death

        Victoria has recorded 2232 new Covid cases hours before the state is due to exit lockdown. It came as NSW had its first spike in cases since lockdown was scrapped.

        Victoria has recorded 2232 new locally acquired Covid-19 infections, as the state prepares to emerge from lockdown at 11.59pm today.

        Twelve more Victorians died from the virus in the past 24 hours, the Department of Health confirmed.

        About 89.2 per cent of Victorians above the age of 16 have received one dose of the Covid-19 vaccine, while 69.3 per cent were fully vaccinated.

        From Friday, the state’s 14-day quarantine protocol for any Victorian who is a close contact to a positive case in a workplace or social setting will be slashed to seven days.

        Victorian Covid-19 response commander Jeroen Weimar said the new rule change would take effect on Friday and would include anyone already in isolation.

        He said the new rule was introduced due to there being a lower risk of transmission within the community as vaccination rates increased.

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      There, is no credible modelling any where on this Planet. I have just done some modelling in the University of Hard Knocks that shows that all of the CO2 produced in “Horse Stralia” (Australia pronounced by the Queen) by Humans and Manufacturing, Mining and everything else can be taken up by all of the Agriculture, Plants, Trees and everything else as well as our Oceans and Seas that surround us. This clearly shows that we are CO2 takers. That means, that SCOMO can go to a very cold and bleak Glasgow and say…….Get Farked……We are the Future of the Planet…….Kangaroos rule OK……LOL

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    OldOzzie

    James Morrow: Tips to survive with freedom intact in a post-Covid world

    With Covid on the ropes, NSW and the nation need to think hard about what comes next. Here are James Morrow’s five suggestions.

    The novel coronavirus may never be completely defeated, but it’s certainly on the ropes.

    Which means that NSW and the nation need to be thinking hard about what comes next. Because otherwise we risk winning the war against Covid but losing the peace.

    Herewith, five suggestions for what NSW and the nation need to do next.

    Demob the army. Over the past two years Australia – and indeed much of the rest of the world – has been in thrall to battalions of scientists, health officials, celebrity experts and lofty sounding “institutes”, all of whom have sought to transform us into a sort of health-ocracy where doctors always have the final say.

    To say that their record has been mixed is to give a bad name to blenders.

    From the World Health Organisation’s toadying to Beijing at the start of the pandemic to local Chief Health Officers giving such helpful advice as don’t touch the football (South Australia) to don’t have an Anzac Day flyover (Queensland) to don’t smile at people (NSW), let’s just say the so-called expert class hasn’t been sending their best.

    And that’s before we get to the Norman Swans and the Burnet Institutes of the world, with their predictions of mass death and destruction if we didn’t at least consider welding peoples’ front doors shut, as they did during Wuhan’s quite literal lockdown.

    Those still out there bleating about needing to wear masks forever should be ignored, or gently informed that the war is over and told to put down their Twitter accounts.

    Crack the codes. Data-hungry governments absolutely love the idea of tracking our every move, but it’s nobody’s damn business when I went to the grocery store or the pub.

    You don’t need to be a crank to imagine that the same sort of infrastructure that’s been used to trace and track Covid could be used for more sinister purposes.

    And if you think that if you’ve done nothing wrong you don’t have anything to worry about, how hard is it to imagine QR codes being used to regulate our personal carbon outputs or alcohol consumption or tying in to our online lives, creating a sort of Australian social credit system?

    After all, local councils have used our metadata to track down litterbugs, when it was supposed to be harvested only to stop terrorists and paedophiles.

    NSW Customer Service Minister Victor Dominello should be made to stick to his promise to turn these things off at the earliest opportunity.

    End segregation. This is another biggie, and one that will be uncomfortable for many: Australia, if we are to get out of this with our liberties intact, will have to at some point soon stop being a two-tier society of the jabbed and un-jabbed.

    Australians have done an admirable job getting vaccinated, and that’s a large part of the reason NSW is doing so well at the moment.

    But for whatever reasons, though, some people won’t – and if we are to trust the vaccines then outside certain settings like health care, the vaccinated should not worry too much about others’ status.

    Otherwise, there is no difference between Gladys Berejiklian saying, when she was premier, that she wouldn’t want to be next to an unvaccinated person, and Mark McGowan saying he won’t open the borders of his hermit kingdom even to the vaccinated.

    Worse, all this sends a message to the anti-vaxxers, who see it as a sign that the vaccinated don’t actually trust the jabs they advocate.

    Open the door. While we’re on the subject of vaccines, can someone please explain how two jabs of Pfizer or AstraZeneca have different levels of effectiveness depending on whether they are coursing through the veins of an Australian versus a Canadian, Brit, or Portuguese?

    The prime minister’s smackdown of Dom Perrottet’s plan to allow vaccinated international travellers, not just Australians, into NSW without quarantine would seem to suggest there is.

    Claims that the dispute was about prioritising getting Australians home sooner look shaky given the push to approve questionable Chinese vaccines to get international students back in the country.


    GGF – go get freedom.
    This may be the hardest word for many, especially in a country where no small number look askance at “liberty” as some sort of American cowboy happy talk.

    But out on the streets of Sydney, people who’ve been locked up and in many cases unable to work for four months seem to have a new appreciation for the concept.

    More than that, they don’t appreciate health bureaucrats, Twitter scolds, and well-paid Zoomerati telling them that their liberties are something that can be turned on and off like a switch depending on how well behaved they are, as if they were naughty teens.

    But if freedom doesn’t come without responsibility, it also doesn’t come without risk.

    Australians, or at least those of us in NSW, have largely woken up to the fact that every argument used by the Covid Zero lockdown brigade could be applied to just about anything – “Oh, you drive your car to the shops? Do you think your convenience is worth 1,200 people dying every year on our roads?”

    Given how quickly we gave up so much liberty, perhaps it’s also time for a broader rethink about just how we think about freedom and how much risk we are willing to accept to enjoy it.

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      Of course this virus crisis is on the ropes. You will NEVER beat a virus that moves from animals to humans. This virus is no worse than a bad flu season. So, how many people have died World Wide? How many people die World Wide in a normal Flu Season? Answer is that you have no Farking Idea. Because no one normally cares. Go back to 2017 and who was talking about the Flu. No one as they were crapping on about save the Planet and Climate Change……..Blahhhhh. Blahhhhh. CRAP

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    robert rosicka

    Not sure if this has been covered before but this story is unusual for the ABC because on the face of it they are criticising Pfizer .

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-10-20/pfizer-covid-19-vaccine-contracts/100553958?fbclid=IwAR05fnf_mQCBbgiX-Xkc9uG9ULAYG2uqEyyXvzArSoGNAcv4Xu_tY9Y6rw4

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      OldOzzie

      Definitely Critical of Pfizer – Bookmarked and downloaded

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      David Maddison

      It’s certainly very strange for Their ABC to offer a story critical of Big Pharma.

      I’m sure it was a mistake they’ll soon delete.

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      David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

      G’day rr,
      I wondered if the writer was so convinced he had a big stick – a bribery allegation – to use against the Coalition, that he didn’t see the corresponding charge against the giver??
      Cheers
      Dave B

      30

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      Lucky

      The company is committed to ..
      The company has a deep sense of responsibility ….

      The ABC reported those statements without question.

      But, check the number of illegal actions of that company over the years, check the size of the fines they paid, consider that those fines were awarded even by the biased US regulatory agencies.

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    hypersonic

    When news broke China had launched two hypersonic missiles the US gov. response was “The white house welcomes stiff opposition”

    Is any more evidence required to realise the most powerful country in the world is ruled by incompetence?

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    OldOzzie

    The ‘Equality’ blues: Feminists cry foul when boys’ netball team wins girls’ tournament

    Gosh, has anyone ever really believed in Equality™?

    The Queensland Suns won the Nissan State under-18 netball tournament last month, and the wrath of many, by easily defeating seven other teams. The issue? The Suns are sons — not daughters like the rest of their competitors.

    Australia apparently also has a Title IX-like standard, hence the Suns’ crushing of the daughters. Yet this thrashing inspired not only condemnation and vulgar comments directed at the boys from some parents during the final game (shameful), but also some caterwauling from a women’s sports advocate, seen in the video below. – Peta Credlin (4 Min 41 Sec)

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    Analitik

    Study commissioned by the Victorian government to justify masking mandate is junk science say experts.

    There has been a lot of low-quality research that has come out in the pandemic, but for this to be used as a basis for a policy change is staggering
    ..
    Not just in relation to this paper but in general I think there has been a reluctance to criticise research and to criticise public health interventions [during the pandemic] and to be seen as a wrecker.
    Unfortunately there is a culture in science which sees criticising other researchers or research as something fundamentally bad – that we should be presenting a united front to laypeople.

    https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/human-body/its-crap-victorian-study-claiming-mandatory-masks-stopped-second-wave-shredded-by-experts/news-story/aeb937d27ec5a79e6b728ade598f49ab

    Mind you, this study was produced by the Burnet Institute which also provides the Victorian government with the modelling being used to set the scope and schedule of the restrictions.

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      OldOzzie

      Australians across the country have been hit with millions of dollars in fines for breaching Covid-19 public health orders since the start of the pandemic, the bulk of which relate to failing to wear a face mask in various settings.

      In July this year, NSW Health admitted that there had not been a single confirmed case of outdoor transmission in the state during the entire pandemic.

      News.com.au asked NSW Health to confirm whether there had been any known cases of outdoor transmission since July, but a spokeswoman would say only that they were “relatively uncommon”.

      “The risk of Covid-19 transmission is far less in outdoor settings than in indoor settings, if people maintain physical distance,” she said.

      “While confirmed cases of outdoor transmission are relatively uncommon, in many cases it can be difficult to pinpoint the exact point of transmission, especially if people have been in each other’s company for long periods of time.”

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        yarpos

        All covered by the “abundance of caution” clause, under which you can make up and inflict whatever your weird little control freak brain can conjure up, eh Dan?

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    David Maddison

    Brazil, like India had a high covid mortality rate and interestingly for tropical countries, both have a Vitamin D deficiency.

    I have previously posted a link for India and it’s easy to find.

    Here is a paper for Brazil. Note that the study was before covid.

    https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29420062/

    Epidemiology of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency in a population in a sunny country: Geospatial meta-analysis in Brazil

    Marcos Pereira-Santos et al. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2019.

    The prevalences of vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency were 28.16% (95% CI: 23.90, 32.40) and 45.26% (95% CI: 35.82, 54.71), respectively, for the Brazilian population. The highest prevalence of deficiency were observed in the southern and southeastern regions and the highest occurrence of vitamin D insufficiency was among the populations of the southeastern and northeastern regions. Finally, there are high prevalence of inadequate vitamin D concentrations among the population, regardless of age group in Brazil. The development of vitamin D food fortification policies in needs to be cautious and carefully planned.

    SEE LINK FOR REST

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    OldOzzie

    Spectator Australia – First lockdown, now segregation

    Joel Agius – 21 October 2021

    As New South Wales Premier Dominic Perrottet leads the way out of lockdowns and restrictions in Australia, a job Scott Morrison should be doing but whose weak and ineffectual leadership prevents him from doing so, the pressure is building up on other State Premiers to follow suit, lest their polling take a dive. While it seemed this was beginning to occur in Victoria with the announcement that, from Thursday, they would be getting their very own Segregation Day, it is not as rosy and delightful as it seems. Where Daniel Andrews is involved, there was always going to be a catch.

    The vaccination rates are not increasing because people necessarily want to take the vaccine. They are only going up because people are being backed into a corner where their lives would be a misery unless they take it, because the government is threatening to take away their rights and freedoms, to take away their jobs, income, and livelihoods, unless they get jabbed. The vaccination rates are nothing to celebrate. They have only been achieved by coercion. One wonders what the true vaccination rates would be if this was not a factor.

    Dan Andrews has also made one other point that should be ringing alarm bells in the minds of Australians, and indeed those places around the world where vaccine passports are being implemented. After saying medical segregation in Victoria would last well into 2022, he stated:

    “Then we’re going to get into booster issues, so it won’t be your first and second dose. It’ll be have you had your third?”

    While NSW can probably trust Perrottet’s word that those who choose not to take the vaccine will be allowed back out into society on December 1, Victorians who make the same choice have no such assurances. In Tuesday edition of the Daily Dan, an emphatic Premier made the announcement that those who remain unvaccinated will not get their freedoms back “four or five weeks” after everyone else. Instead, they will remain segregated from the rest of society.

    When asked how long this will continue, Andrews responded: “I cannot put a date on it, but it will not be when we reach 90%. It will not be anytime soon. That’s going to function for a period of time, well into 2022. For instance, I’ll give you an example. The Grand Prix is in April. I don’t think there’s going to be crowds at the Grand Prix made up of people who have not been double dosed.”

    From this statement, it is clear that the Victorian Premier, who has become infamous for his fondness of lockdowns and some of the most heavy-handed restrictions in the country, including curfews, in addition to taking the record for the most locked-down place in the world (a record no one should be proud of), has no intention of giving up a significant degree of control anytime soon. He plans to keep Victoria segregated for the foreseeable future. The goalposts have shifted yet again, from 70%, to 80%, to 90%, and now to practically never-ending lockdowns for anyone who makes a conscious decision not to get vaccinated.

    In the mind of a power-obsessed politician like Daniel Andrews, it may seem strategic to continue to hold part of the state hostage, given relinquishing too much power would return one in his position to their usual lesser degree of control. The power he currently retains over his State is incredulous; it is far too great for one man. As 19th-century British politician and historian Lord Acton oo
    observed, “Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely.” This has become more evident as politicians slowly soak up more and more power than they have been given by their constituents.

    It has reached the point where the Victorian government is now locking politicians who refuse to hand over their vaccination information to the state out of parliament, preventing them from exercising their democratically elected right to vote on Parliamentary matters. Four members of the Legislative Council, including outspoken Liberal Democrats David Limbrick and Tim Quilty, remain unable to enter Victorian Parliament and vote on Bills that come before the chamber. This is despite the fact that they are both vaccinated. They just do not wish to take part in the new segregative system in place.

    But it seems Dictator Dan is much more interested in keeping his title intact, and transforming Victoria from the Lockdown State to the Segregation State.

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      Forrest Gardener

      We can only hope that the law of natural consequences kicks in sooner rather than later.

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        Gary S

        As I have previously said, it may be only a matter of time before Andrews is confronted by a badly disaffected citizen packing some serious career-ending hardware.

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          yarpos

          I was discussing this with the good lady wife today. The smirker has destroyed a lot of lives and continues to yank peoples chain with his petty BS. It only takes one looney to snap. VICPol seem to worship Dan rather than the law so I imagine he is well protected. I wouldnt recommend retirement in VIC though, could be awkward.

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      Tel

      The vaccination rates are nothing to celebrate. They have only been achieved by coercion.

      It’s a type of conscription really … the government is laying claim to your body and demanding the right to use you to limit the infection spread.

      It would be a moral outrage even if it worked, but even more insane when you consider that country after country demonstrates that vaccination does NOT stop the spread of COVID (Singapore, Israel, Ireland, UK and a bunch of tiny nations).

      I don’t know where this is leading to but it cannot be a good place. There are very deep resentments and distrust amongst the people who have been forced into this, and government has reached into the authoritarian toolbox and decided that more beatings will improve morale. When you look at the next few years of economic disaster (empty shelves Venezuela style, brutal price inflation) in the USA it will only mare the resentment worse.

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      Serp

      Andrews is frustrated to the utmost that cannot make it a serious crime to decline covid vaccination.

      Surely he’s the “rough beast” of Yeats’s The Second Coming:

      And what rough beast, its hour come round at last, Slouches towards Bethlehem to be born?

      What an awful place he’s made this state of Victoria.

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      mawm

      Never forget the violence the riot police meted out on their own. This could never have happened without specific instructions from Desperate Dan. He hates you and is willing to do anything to subjugate you.

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    OldOzzie

    Study Destroys Justification for Vaccine Mandates

    CDC and State Health Department scientists find similar or higher viral load of Covid-19 virus among the vaccinated as compared to the unvaccinated

    The CDC and State Health Department scientists just released a study that again reflects the dangers of making civil and individual rights contingent on a medical procedure. This study, titled Shedding of Infectious SARS-CoV-2 Despite Vaccination, reviewed swab specimens from 36 counties in Wisconsin from the end of June to the end of July 2021. They then checked the viral load of SARS-CoV-2 in each swab.

    What did they find? High viral load in “158 of 232 unvaccinated (68%…) and 156 of 225 fully vaccinated (69%…) symptomatic individuals.” Meaning there was effectively no difference between the symptomatic vaccinated and unvaccinated in terms of who was carrying, and therefore spreading, the virus.

    But the study does not end there. It also found high viral loads in “7 of 24 unvaccinated (29%…) and 9 of 11 fully vaccinated asymptomatic individuals (82%…).” Meaning, among asymptomatic individuals, the vaccinated had a higher percentage with a high viral load.

    Reflecting that the vaccine does not prevent spread is a paper out of the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies titled Increase in COVID-19 are unrelated to level of vaccination across 68 countries and 24947 counties in the United States. It found that, “the trend line suggests a marginally positive association such that countries with higher percentage of population fully vaccinated have higher COVID-19 cases per 1 million people. Notably, Israel with over 60% of their population fully vaccinated had the highest COVID-19 cases per 1 million people in the last 7 days.”

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      Forrest Gardener

      Nice to see studies which present useful basic information. The question though is where does this take people.

      If as the propaganda says uninjected people are likely to suffer more severe symptoms then it is reasonable to take every precaution to being near injected people. The higher viral load likely to be carried by injected people clueless that they are infectious makes them a very real danger.

      On the other hand I can imagine a proportion of injected people saying DILLIGAF. After all even if they are infections they will only get mild symptoms. It’s not like they would figure they will become one the “breakthrough” cases who ends up hospitalized or worse.

      My money is still on keeping myself to myself, avoiding crowds, and waiting until an effective anti-viral is publicly available. My crystal ball says that will be early next year.

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        Serp

        Next year has been cancelled but they’re not game to tell us preferring to let us decide for ourselves when we don’t get to Christmas.

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          Tel

          To coin a phrase: “Two Weexing” … telling lies about your agenda by rolling it out a little bit at a time.

          Unfortunately, this political activity already has a name “Salami Slicing” which came from the socialists (how unsurprising) … and it is exactly what they are doing with this creeping totalitarianism.

          https://politicaldictionary.com/words/salami-tactics/

          First mandate people wash their hands (that’s innocent enough) … then mandate they stay distant … then mandate they work from home … then it’s only for the nurses, but then for the doctors, then for the truck drivers. Hey, only two weeks! Emergency powers, only temporary!

          These guys know exactly what they are doing.

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        David-of-Cooyal-in-Oz

        G’day F G,
        Don’t wait. At least start with a good regime of vitamin D3 and zinc, and either IVM or HCQ if you can get either in your location. If you can’t, try Quercetin, and failing even that an apple a day may give you enough quercetin to keep the COVID away. (I often wondered if the old adage had any value, and recently discovered apples do contain quercetin which is a zinc ionophore.)
        Good luck, and keep well.
        Cheers
        Dave B

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    OldOzzie

    Professional, Amateur & Wannabe Statisticians Alike – Let’s See What You’ve Got!

    Mater Posted on October 20, 2021

    I put these graphs together from information gleaned from:

    Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemiology reports, Australia, 2020–2021 and COVID-19 vaccination daily rollout update.

    I’m by no means saying they are 100% accurate, because there is some extraordinarily sloppy work contained within these documents, and it can be easily misunderstood. Combined with their constantly changing of age groups, datasets, assumptions and just plain old data disappearance, it makes it difficult to be exact (without looking inside the tent…which we’ll never be allowed to do).

    However, I am confident that these graphs reasonably accurately represent the data provided. Happy to adjust, if I’m in error. I’m not infallible.

    rickwsays: October 20, 2021 at 4:37 pm

    To my untrained eye, impact of vaccines looks statistically insignificant until you hit the 80+ bracket.

    FMD

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    Steve of Cornubia

    Take a look at the Covid deaths data over at Worldometer, for Israel. There have been three major peaks. I can’t yet align the first with any particular event, but the following two are intriguing.

    The second peak starts ramping up around 20 December 2020, precisely the time when vaccinations started.

    The third peak starts ramping up around 30 July 2021, precisely when the third booster was commenced.

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      Forrest Gardener

      Agreed. My best guess is that the peaks are cyclic and 4 to 5 months apart. It’s a bit like reading tea leaves but the current decline appears to be bottoming out. That would suggest another uptrend with the next peak about Christmas.

      But as they say in science correlation is not causation, and in share trading they say the trend is your friend until the bend at the end.

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      Forrest Gardener

      Sorry Steve I didn’t notice that you were looking at Israel. My comments were about global trends.

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    another ian

    From a comment at Chiefio

    “Good news! Humanity has wiped out smallpox and almost wiped out polio. Now, the doctors have wiped out influenza! (end snark)
    https://i0.wp.com/wmbriggs.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/whoflutime-1.png?w=1200&ssl=1

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    another ian

    Upcoming feather storm

    “President Trump Announces Trump Media and Technology Group and ‘Truth Social’ Media Platform
    October 20, 2021 | Sundance | 10 Comments”

    https://theconservativetreehouse.com/blog/2021/10/20/president-trump-announces-trump-media-and-technology-group-and-truth-social-media-platform/

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    OldOzzie

    New China Law Will Punish Parents For Children’s ‘Bad Behavior’

    China has drafted a law that would punish the parents of children who exhibit “very bad behavior” – which would be one of the first laws of its kind anywhere in the modern world.

    A spokesman for the Legislative Affairs Commission of China’s parliament, which is often dubbed in the West a “rubber-stamp” institution for the dictates of Communist party leadership, said “There are many reasons for adolescents to misbehave, and the lack of or inappropriate family education is the major cause.”

    It comes amid a broader initiative by President Xi and party leaders to stamp out what they’ve dubbed the false “spiritual opium” of Western culture, in reference to everything from internet gaming, to worship of Hollywood celebrities, to pop music, also to things deemed effeminate.

    The blanket youth cultural reform initiative centered on “anti-addiction” has already resulted in severe restrictions placed on online video gaming for people under 18-years of age. A decree passed in early September grabbed world headlines and drew outrage from West-based human rights groups. Currently children are only legally allowed to participate in online gaming from 8 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and public holidays.

    Additionally video games and other popular media content that don’t promote “correct values” are being banned.

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    OldOzzie

    US Marshals: We’re Looking to See If the January 6 Defendants Are Being Deliberately Mistreated

    The feds have locked up hundreds of people connected to the January 6 riot. That’s all it was, by the way. It was a riot. It was not a violent insurrection. It wasn’t an armed coup. It wasn’t worse than the American Civil War. It sure as hell wasn’t worse than the 9/11 attacks. It was mostly a bunch of people walking around inside the Capitol Building. It’s why Democrats don’t want us to see all the security camera footage. It’s bland and boring as hell—far from the “end of the republic” narrative they’ve been stroking for months. Get over it. Everyone else has—and the fact that hundreds have been arrested undercuts the reasoning behind creating a select committee to investigate how this happened. No one cares—especially now.

    Yet, since hundreds are locked up as quasi-political prisoners, a judge seemed worried about deliberate mistreatment. One defendant had a broken wrist which required surgery. DC officials dithered on doing anything for four months. Why? Well, they wouldn’t say, which is why they were held in contempt.

    Judge Royce C. Lamberth called for an investigation into the conditions of the prisoners and the US Marshal Service has acted upon that request (via NBC4 Washington):

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      Dennis

      Net zero emissions was of course the next stage after Paris Agreement emissions targets due to be achieved by 2030 as discussed at that Conference.

      I wonder if the pressure to commence net zero immediately is based on the cooling data record, the fear that if member nations do not sign an Agreement to support net zero emissions now they will probably be forced to retreat as climate hoax warming fades into real cooling?

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        Raving

        I think COP26 is falling apart at the seams. People will go to extremes to keep it stiched together. Just look at the mushrooming diverging interests.

        Put another way, what can they agree to. More of the same?

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    Liberator

    According to a recent Roy Morgan Survey of 1024 Australian respondents, only 24% percent of survey respondents consider environmental/climate change to be the most significant concerns for Australians, down from 41% two years ago. That means 76% are more concerned about other things, right now – Covid.

    I love how they clump together covid and environmental issues into the one basket:

    A clear majority of over 57% of Australians mentioned either Climate change/Global warming or issues related to COVID-19 as the biggest problems facing the World.

    https://www.roymorgan.com/findings/8829-most-important-problems-facing-australia-world-october-2021-202110190600?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2021-10-19-AU-MRU&utm_content=2021-10-19-AU-MRU+CID_4eb3908f822663ae7b331d892b4a73ba&utm_source=Market%20Research%20Update&utm_term=COVID-19%20is%20the%20most%20important%20problem%20facing%20the%20World%20and%20Australia%20%20just%20ahead%20of%20Global%20Warming%20%20Climate%20Change

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    John Connor II

    The Deep State cannot stop the unprecedented awakening

    Greg Hunter from USA Watchdog with Alex Newman.

    https://rumble.com/vntu3n-deep-state-cannot-stop-unprecedented-awakening-alex-newman.html

    Time is running out for the power-crazed globalists and their paid minions.
    Australian minions take note.
    You know who you are as do we.
    History WILL repeat as far as you’re concerned.

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    Destroyer D69

    https://www.tga.gov.au/covid-19-rapid-antigen-self-tests-are-approved-australia. Smoke and mirrors???? I have just checked the instructions for ALL the listed test kits and find that the accuracy of their result is a comparison to the results obtained from a PCR test of a sample from the same source. So they are subject to all the same errors and false results as a PCR test.

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    John Connor II

    Meanwhile in New Zealand.

    Pharmacy Hands Out ‘Blue Pill’ Jellybeans to Reward People For Getting Vaccinated

    https://nworeport.me/2021/10/21/pharmacy-hands-out-blue-pill-jellybeans-to-reward-people-for-getting-vaccinated/

    Says it all really…

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    Geoff Sherrington

    Am I alone with concerns about ethnicity balance in TV viewing?
    So often, especially in recent commercials, we seem to have parts for an oriental person, plus an African-American, plus an aborigine and often a person in middle eastern dress. Next time you see a people commercial, see if you spot this imbalance of ethnic groups.
    Australians who have been here for generations have been most welcoming to immigrants and minority groups. But, broadcasters like ABC have directives to maintain balance in their presentations. Here are some population percentages:
    “British continue to be the majority with 67.4% of the population. This is followed by other European ethnicities: Irish (8.7%), Italian (3.8%), and German (3.7%). Those of Chinese ethnicity represent 3.6% of the population and the Aboriginal, and Native Australians are now only 3%. Other ethnicities can also be found, though in smaller numbers: Indian (1.7%), Greek (1.6%), Dutch (1.2%), and Other (5.3%). The “Other” ethnicity includes individuals from many countries, particularly European and Asian.”
    Source: Demographics and Ethnic Groups of Australia – WorldAtlas

    C’mon Aussie, come on – before you forget what an Aussie looks like.

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    MP

    Hansard is the site for the debates in parliament, the debate on those petitions should be in here, if you have a strong stomach. https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Hansard

    Apparently whales will bump into Oil platforms but not off shore windmills, windmills will have a “mind your head” sign on them.

    https://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/chamber/hansardr/25165/toc_pdf/House%20of%20Representatives_2021_10_21.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf

    Windmills off shore good.
    Offshore Electricity Infrastructure (Consequential Amendments) Bill 2021

    Oil and Gas platforms bad.
    This is the government’s gas obsession taken to the extreme of endangering our local economies and coastline.
    Our local environment sustains our local economy, from coastal ecosystems, fishing, tourism and hospitality, our
    welfare and our health. We have seen, through the last 18 months with COVID, how important our local
    environment is. It has sustained us and we have been grateful, and now we urgently need to protect it. The area in
    12 HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Thursday, 21 October 2021
    CHAMBER
    and adjacent to PEP-11 is home to millions of people, a whale migration path and significant marine biodiversity.
    It’s therefore absolutely in the public interest that this be dealt with without delay today.

    And in the senate they are debating a Bill to give the UNWTO more control over our trade. Stop digging you pack of tosspots.

    https://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/chamber/hansards/25181/toc_pdf/Senate_2021_10_21.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf

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    OldOzzie

    82%-Vaccinated Singapore Records Highest Daily Coronavirus Cases Yet

    Singapore, which has a Chinese coronavirus vaccination rate of 82 percent, recorded its highest single-day increase in new locally transmitted cases of the virus Tuesday with 3,994 infections.

    Singapore’s government tightened restrictions on in-person dining and social gatherings in the metropolis on September 27 as part of a stated effort to help reduce transmission of the Chinese coronavirus. In the three weeks since then, the city-state’s coronavirus caseload has mushroomed.

    “Singapore reported 1,647 new COVID-19 [Chinese coronavirus] cases on September 27, the day measures were tightened. By the next day, new cases topped 2,000 for the first time, and have not fallen below since,” CNA reported on October 19.

    “A week later, on October 5, the country reported more than 3,000 cases,” the Singapore-based news agency recalled.

    The republic’s coronavirus death rate has likewise increased over the past three weeks. Singapore’s Ministry of Health (MOH) reported two deaths from the Chinese coronavirus on September 27. The city-state’s coronavirus death tally “varied in the following days, ranging from two to nine. It crossed into double digits on October 9, with Singapore reporting 11 deaths that day,” CNA recalled on Tuesday.

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    MP

    Malcom Roberts gives them something to ignore,

    Senator ROBERTS (Queensland) (09:39): Well, well, well, the Labor Party, as part of the precursor to the
    Albanese-Bandt coalition government, calls this a stunt. The Labor party is exactly correct. It is a stunt. The No. 1
    issue here is integrity and the Greens’ complete lack of integrity. They have never provided the empirical scientific
    evidence for their claims. First it was Greta: ‘We’ll rely on Greta.’ Then it became, ‘We’ll rely on the Queen.’ Now,
    it’s, ‘We’ll rely on the Pope’—and most of them are atheists. My goodness, what are we coming to in this country?
    This mob is hijacking jobs—manufacturing jobs, coalmining jobs, farmers’ jobs. This is an absolute disgrace,
    because they show no integrity towards the people of this country; they show no integrity towards this parliament,
    none whatsoever. They tell lies and they make up stuff.
    We now see them calling for the science. I want the science. I challenge Senator Waters to provide the empirical
    scientific evidence that proves carbon dioxide from human activity affects the climate and needs to be cut. She
    failed to provide it 11 years ago. She ran—

    Read on https://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/chamber/hansards/25180/toc_pdf/Senate_2021_10_20.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf

    And from youth voice in parliament week, this gem. Our own little Greta maybe,
    Hi. I’m Sujaan, I’m 11 and I am from the Canberra electorate.
    Can you think back to when you were my age, and what you wanted the world to look like in 20 years’ time?
    You might have imagined flying cars, or hoverboards, or a world where everyone has access to healthy food and clean water.
    But would you have imagined the only living structure you can spot from outer space, our very own Great Barrier Reef to be at
    risk of dying because of carbon in the atmosphere?
    The current generation of adults needs to fix the problems in today’s world, so when people of my generation are adults we don’t
    have to spend our time fixing the problems that we have now. We will have to spend our time solving problems or inventing
    new ways to do things in the future which we haven’t even begun to imagine yet.

    The future voters are worried they will have to spend their time doing what man has done since he walked upright, created, dropped off by aliens.

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      clarence.t

      “”I’m 11 …..
      ….. our very own Great Barrier Reef to be at risk of dying because of carbon in the atmosphere”

      Sorry little child, but there is currently more coral on the GBR than there has ever been in your whole life time !

      Coral is living organisms..and guess what, living organisms need CO2 to stay alive !!

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    Ronin

    “The future voters are worried they will have to spend their time doing what man has done since he walked upright, created, dropped off by aliens.”

    What the hell. ?????????

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    Hanrahan

    Transitory inflation? Not so much.

    Truth is, nothing is so inflationary as inflationary expectations. I remember running a servo in the 70’s when they were workshops with bowsers out front. We had a lot of minor bits ‘n pieces on the shelves and may need to order many more, depending who drove in. At the time I was always getting new price lists. “Stop complaining”, I was told, “it has been months since the last”. Months! Really!

    Expectations mean you raise prices preemptively, not reactively.

    Then the interest rates follow. Due to fortunate timing, not foresight, I raised a LOC [I was in the coin-in-the-slot business then and buying the equipment] at the going commercial rates at the time but in the fine print there was a 3% max extra ceiling on the rates. I used the LOC to pay off my mortgage [don’t try that today] so survived better than some.

    The moral of the story is not to be vulnerable. Debt can work in inflationary times but only if you can avoid the high interest rates that go with inflation.

    This post for amusement only, I am not your financial advisor.

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    Hanrahan

    The tail that wagged the dog!

    This too is for amusement only. There is much truth in it but some hyperbole as well. [email protected] Gillard! I will never be able to pronounce that properly again.

    How Australia Is Crashing the World Economy And Taking Down China

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uGzCQZUrs2k

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    another ian

    Maybe there is hope?

    “THIS IS CNN: Sen. Joe Manchin has ‘committed violence’ on climate legislation before.”

    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/this-is-cnn-sen-joe-manchin-has-committed-violence-on-climate-legislation-before-in-an-anal/

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    another ian

    “It’s Probably Nothing”

    If you thought that chips were a problem have a look at magnesium

    http://www.smalldeadanimals.com/2021/10/21/its-probably-nothing-113/

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    Sherrin Ball

    This whole Mantra is entering the deadly stage. The world is waking up to this giant fraud. Patrick King in Alberta Canada have proved covid does not exist in Court. Dr David Martin has proof covid patents have been around since 1999!!
    The PCR con merchant who put the PCR device into covid service is a [SNIP] (Christian Drosten – he’s a medical [SNIP]!!) Fauci was responsible for 1000’s of deaths in the US by forcing doctors to use Rem-Chem (Remdesivir) on early Covid patients(common cold flu cases!!) This drug kills the kidneys thus flooding the lungs. The patient drowns to death!! See Bryan Ibiz about this story!!
    Dr Reiner Fuellmich is putting together the largest Tort case the world has ever seen. Nuremberg 2.0 trials are coming.

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    • #

      Sherrin, yes and no. There are different patents, different coronaviruses, good tests and bad tests. There is also crime I’m sure, but we need to be careful how we describe it.

      To win this information war — good links are King and careful descriptions are a winner. Thanks.

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    another ian

    “EM-DAT Disaster Database Creating Data Disasters”

    “Both of these reports themselves are “Data Disasters” – in that the data upon which they are based is so flawed that it is not fit for purpose. The flaw is, or should be, obvious to anyone even glancing at the data. ”

    More at

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2021/10/21/em-dat-disaster-database-creating-data-disasters/

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    Raving

    From the BBC

    COP26: PM warned over aid cuts ahead of climate summit

    The COP26 doll continues to bulge at the seams

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    Dennis

    Nuclear banned in Australia but Lucas Heights reactor exempted.

    Read all about ANSTO where research and training continues today and one area of real interest, and note the commentary, is about nuclear power stations;

    https://www.ansto.gov.au/research/programs/nuclear-fuel-cycle/advanced-nuclear-reactors

    00